The Sewing Place

How practical a buy?

rowe1311

Re: How practical a buy?
« Reply #15 on: May 13, 2017, 12:19:33 PM »
I hope you got your machine and getting a chance to have a play around.  I also have a 201k that I was just given and I really like it.  It is the beige aluminium one rather than the black cast iron but I really like it. 

Strangely, I am wanting to convert my electric 201 to a hand crank.  I have a few electric machines and don't really want another.  It is sitting in a treadle base so I would like to be able to use it as a treadle and a hand crank so the kids can use it and I can take it outside without having to hook up electricity. 

I really hope you like the machine and if I were closer we could swap the hand crank and motor, but Glasgow I think is a bit far for that.  Let us know how you get on. 

Angela

Marniesews

Re: How practical a buy?
« Reply #16 on: May 13, 2017, 17:25:59 PM »
 :D  :vintage: :D  :vintage: :D

You can uncross your fingers now!!! I've only just got back - been out all day so it'll be a few hours yet before any playing is possible. I got her for £61 in the end and am very happy with that. I'll keep you posted.
Aka Jacky F in a former life...

Cheesecake

Re: How practical a buy?
« Reply #17 on: May 13, 2017, 18:20:10 PM »
That's good to hear, am sure you will enjoy it. :)

Snowgoose

Re: How practical a buy?
« Reply #18 on: May 13, 2017, 19:30:39 PM »
Hooray!  I am so pleased for you  :D. Hope you have many, many happy hours of  :vintage:  :snip: :pin:  :thread:  :D
'You think dogs will not be in heaven? I tell you, they will be there long before any of us.'
Robert Louis Stevenson

Marniesews

Re: How practical a buy?
« Reply #19 on: May 16, 2017, 22:36:11 PM »
Well, I had to wait a while for a play as hubby set down with baby wipes, oil and cloths to clean, polish and lubricate her (I didn't want to spoil his fun). She looked pretty clean but plenty of general grime seemed to come off regardless. She purrs along now and I've got some size 100 & 110 needles for the heavier jobs that I think she's destined to help with.

Talking of which...she did a good job with my DGD's 'school bag' this evening. It's really a big ladies' handbag which is the thing these days for school apparently, so of course they don't last that long with all the abuse of school books etc.  -< And I suppose that answers the title of this thread too.

I brought the 201K to my daughter's to show off with the excuse of repairing the bag.  ;)  Was nicely done with heavier thread although I need to adjust the tension. It was fine for sewing cotton on 4 but had to turn it up to 9 for the bag and could have been better a bit tighter still. I'm sure I saw a video somewhere on adjusting the overall tension setting somewhere so I'll have to have a go at that sometime before my next heavy duty sewing.

Some pics too.

      
Aka Jacky F in a former life...

Lilian

Re: How practical a buy?
« Reply #20 on: May 16, 2017, 22:48:01 PM »
Glad you are enjoying your new machine, they are just a dream to use.  :vintage: :)
Willing but not always able :)

arrow

Re: How practical a buy?
« Reply #21 on: May 16, 2017, 23:48:52 PM »
The heaviest thread I have used is a Mettler polyester type, which is a bit heavier than Gütermann's top stitch thread. I sometimes need to adjust the bobbin tension just a bit for these, mine is generally set for Gütermann's sew-all weight polyester, but I use all kinds. I max out on needle size on my cast iron machines; the easily take 140 needle (#22); it can be an avantage with the kind of webbing used to streangthen bags. With the small screw driver you can reach the bobbin tension screw from under the side of the bobbin lid when the machine is tilted slighly up from the base; or you have to slide it completely off. It's a joy to sew on this machine when it's all cleaned and oiled. Your look like it's in perfect shape cosmetically. The metal bits should shine up further with the right stuff.

Marniesews

Re: How practical a buy?
« Reply #22 on: May 17, 2017, 00:35:11 AM »
The metal bits should shine up further with the right stuff.

I've been thinking about this...which 'right stuff' would you suggest, arrow?
Aka Jacky F in a former life...

arrow

Re: How practical a buy?
« Reply #23 on: May 17, 2017, 19:27:26 PM »
I bought a small tub of Quick-Glo for my 201, I knew it would do a good job on chromed bicycle parts too. It cleans and polishes up needle and presser bar like new. I think these are forged steel, at least steel with out chrome or nickle and they can be tough to shine up. The faceplate and chromed lids shines up nicely too. For this job it turn out better than Autosol, (not to degrade Autosol in any way, it has its' advantages). There are lots of polishes, I'm sure others are just as effective.

I don't know how to describe it really, but I take a rag or tear a strip of a cloth and when I rub it against the needle bar half a century of grime and dried up oil comes off in just a few seconds. It's  made for chromed parts on cars, but other metals too. It removes rust and grime with ease. If you have something that already does this it's good enough, but if you happen to struggle to get these part clean looking I'm just saying there are better polishes available.

Maximum

Re: How practical a buy?
« Reply #24 on: May 17, 2017, 20:45:59 PM »
What a lovely find and a good price! Encourage your OH to help and play - that way you don't get oily  ;)
I think getting a new motor is the best way forward as the electrics will be sound. Some old wiring can be shocking in more ways than one. I agree with Arrow - I wouldn't accept a white motor on a black machine though. In the meantime enjoy the hand crank. I converted my 99k to hand crank and I just love the sound she makes as she stitches. Grandchildren also like to turn the handle while I mend their bits and bobs.

DalronAU

Re: How practical a buy?
« Reply #25 on: May 19, 2017, 06:49:22 AM »
To protect the paint and decals nothing works better than good old Singer sewing machine oil.  Switching between a handcrank and a motor is job that takes only a matter of minutes and a screwdriver.  I regularly switch those two items around between my machines.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2017, 06:51:55 AM by DalronAU »

arrow

Re: How practical a buy?
« Reply #26 on: May 19, 2017, 14:08:58 PM »
If the shellac is in good condition I lean towards resin based car polish; it gives a hard protective film that stays clean and clear. Sewing machine oil has a few advantages compared to most furniture polishes, since it's a pure mineral oil it will not oxidise over time, but it will stain the machine if not wiped off. On the black japanning it will harldy show other than if it happens over the decals. I wonder what museums do to clean and protect their show pieces? I know they fuzz a lot with old furnture, polishes and cleans wood and carvings (with shellac finish). I think there is a wax made of purified mineral oils because it doesn't oxidise and will not affect the finish in any bad way decades from now.
« Last Edit: May 19, 2017, 15:18:28 PM by arrow »

Snowgoose

Re: How practical a buy?
« Reply #27 on: May 19, 2017, 14:23:22 PM »
If you do a search for 'Renaissance Micro-Crystalline Wax' this could be ideal!  It is used extensively in conservation work.  It's brilliant stuff - Amazon have it! 8)
'You think dogs will not be in heaven? I tell you, they will be there long before any of us.'
Robert Louis Stevenson