The Sewing Place

Greenthumbing for Spring!

twopence

Re: Greenthumbing for Spring!
« Reply #30 on: March 15, 2017, 20:53:15 PM »
Fran if you can fix some curved guttering to the fence in the sunny area then you can grow salad mixes in this filled with compost and just cut as you need.

Francesca

Re: Greenthumbing for Spring!
« Reply #31 on: March 20, 2017, 11:14:51 AM »
My armandii flowered!!

So excited. I'm just hoping that after it flowers fully it continues growing it's greenery outwards as it didn't grow that bushy over the last summer.

Trying to find out the name of the mega plant I bought that has just grown into this gigantic flowering thing really quickly, so I can buy it again.

Sage green leaves, long stems with purple sprouting flowers on the end. Low and shrubby, stayed green all winter. Reminds me of lavender but with the flowers sprouting small and posey-like rather than long and fox-glovey. Don't think it's an allium as they are more rounded.
« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 11:26:13 AM by Francesca »

Bodgeitandscarper

Re: Greenthumbing for Spring!
« Reply #32 on: March 20, 2017, 11:57:54 AM »


Trying to find out the name of the mega plant I bought that has just grown into this gigantic flowering thing really quickly, so I can buy it again.

Sage green leaves, long stems with purple sprouting flowers on the end. Low and shrubby, stayed green all winter. Reminds me of lavender but with the flowers sprouting small and posey-like rather than long and fox-glovey. Don't think it's an allium as they are more rounded.

Post a pic, I'm sure someone will identify it for you :)

Francesca

Re: Greenthumbing for Spring!
« Reply #33 on: March 20, 2017, 12:00:07 PM »
Post a pic, I'm sure someone will identify it for you :)

I will try to get one at the weekend. I've just gone through the RHS plant finder but can't see it. It must be quite popular, seen it in a few gardens.

Edit: Found an old pic from when it was first planted (though it was sharing with a smaller allium).

It's got to be three times the size of that now, at least. Maybe four times!
« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 12:02:59 PM by Francesca »

twopence

Re: Greenthumbing for Spring!
« Reply #34 on: March 20, 2017, 13:44:00 PM »
That looks like an Erysium to me or everlasting wallflower.  It can get rather big and leggy but is very easy to take cuttings from and you need to cut the dead flower stalks off to reveal the new ones coming.  I dug out one last year that had spread to about six foot around and four foot high.  It was beautiful but far too big and taking over.

Francesca

Re: Greenthumbing for Spring!
« Reply #35 on: March 20, 2017, 13:53:46 PM »
Yes you're right it's Erysimum 'Bowles's Mauve' - just googled and found that name and it rings a bell!

I'm going to take it out of the pot, and plant it in the ground. I actually believe I have two plants in the pot... can't quite remember. But I'll try and separate them if I can.

The tree stump will come out of the back bank at some point and then I plan to try and plant things all over the bank. I want to completely cover it in green and colour, no earth to be shown. When we get the low retaining wall in that will help.

I'm also going to try and put up some sort of thin/easy trellis type thing to block off the "no man's land" by the shed. So I need a very fast growing climber for that. Honeysuckle?

Racketandrufus

Re: Greenthumbing for Spring!
« Reply #36 on: March 20, 2017, 19:47:46 PM »
French lavender isn't very hardy so may not come back. English lavender is tough though and easy to take cuttings from.

If you have a Wilko it's worth taking a look- I got potatoes there - 5 seed potatoes for a £1 and a bag of onion sets for the same. We don't need many spuds so I put five each in two tubs ( old leaky water butts cut in half). I use nematodes on slugs and although last year I didn't think they worked well my delphiniums have popped up unscathed this year. I pour leftover coffee and grounds on my hostas so that might work for you.

Aldi had multi packs of herb seeds a couple of weeks ago and often get plug plants of veg and flowers in.

Francesca

Re: Greenthumbing for Spring!
« Reply #37 on: March 20, 2017, 22:18:00 PM »
French lavender isn't very hardy so may not come back. English lavender is tough though and easy to take cuttings from.

If you have a Wilko it's worth taking a look- I got potatoes there - 5 seed potatoes for a £1 and a bag of onion sets for the same. We don't need many spuds so I put five each in two tubs ( old leaky water butts cut in half). I use nematodes on slugs and although last year I didn't think they worked well my delphiniums have popped up unscathed this year. I pour leftover coffee and grounds on my hostas so that might work for you.

Aldi had multi packs of herb seeds a couple of weeks ago and often get plug plants of veg and flowers in.

Yeah I didn't realise my french lavender was dead and gone, it was only a quid from Morrisons though. I'll give English lavender a go as I know it keeps going.

I'll have a look at Wilko! Nematodes did absolutely nothing for me.

Coffee grounds is a good idea, we have a lot of them (every weekend boyf makes a big pot).

Fajita

Re: Greenthumbing for Spring!
« Reply #38 on: March 21, 2017, 08:55:30 AM »
If you live near a waitrose, they will often have their old coffee grounds outside the shop, free for people to take.

Francesca

Re: Greenthumbing for Spring!
« Reply #39 on: March 29, 2017, 13:50:54 PM »
Although the gardening must wait to be properly attended on Saturday, I just climbed up the slope in my slippers to get a good look at the armandii - pleased to say that where I thought it was not growing that much at all, it's actually just been growing OUTWARDS and winding it's way round other plants, oops!

I managed to grab all five tender stems (each about  3-4ft long) and wrap them upwards around the trellis I've lovingly put up for them so hopefully the trellis will start to fill out. Luckily they weren't too woody and hard already.

Need to buy some green cable ties so I can tie them into place better and encourage them upwards. But I'm glad that there are lots of new shoots and leaves.

The Erysimum is insanely huge it's almost laughable and I have no idea how it's got so big in such a tiny pot. I will move it out and replant it. We are getting the tree stump removed from the bed so I will need things to fill it.

Any other fast growers that are good for low, shrubby coverage? Things that I could get planted now and would have made considerable coverage by autumn... need to be perennial and low maintenance, partial sun.

Once we have the front garden done, I will be able to put a pot out there in the middle of the current "drive" and am looking for something tall that can sit in it to provide privacy. Bay tree maybe, but they're very expensive. Japanese maple? Might be a little short.

Francesca

Re: Greenthumbing for Spring!
« Reply #40 on: April 02, 2017, 19:04:32 PM »
Finally got out into the garden today to find one of my (empty) strawberry bags has blown away. Literally blown off into the sunset, I have no idea how it's vanished considering the garden is all enclosed with high fences.

Anyway, my friend helped me out pulling up all the strawberries from the planter of last year and started replanting them into the remaining bag I have so that's all hung up now and looking good! Ordered two more bags for the remaining plants to pot out this week.

Also planted seedling trays of: oregano, rosemary, lemon mint, coriander, chives and spinach. Covered for now so they stay warm and will uncover them once they've starter going places. Then I've got another herb selection of seeds waiting, also sunflowers, chillis, catnip and wild garlic to get going once I can move these seedlings out into bigger pots. So many plants! Sooo many.

Garden work is being done end of the month so there is not a lot I can do until then IRT the bigger plants and moving things into the ground. I am going to pull a willow trellis across between shed and hopefully get some pyracantha growing up it, managed to buy little plants from Morrisons for just £1.75 so will keep them in pots to grow them a bit before the end of the month when I can plant them out :D

Francesca

Re: Greenthumbing for Spring!
« Reply #41 on: April 10, 2017, 10:41:33 AM »
Managed to score a bargain last night. Was looking on eBay for terracotta pots and found someone selling a joblot of 10 medium to large pots for £25. Got them all! And even better, three have plants in! Two have established cannas lilies in and one has a yellow rose shrub! I can't believe my luck. They haven't yet sprouted up so I still get the joy of seeing them come up but without having to purchase them. The seller told me the cannas lilies will multiply if you hack apart the bulb at the end of the season so likely I will be able to plant a few more around the garden.

Cannot wait for this tree stump to be gone so I can start making my garden look nice. And getting turf. It's going to look so nice!

I planted up some lavender last night in a big pot hoping it will grow large and bushy. I want to have lavender shrubs in long planters along the pavement edge in the front garden as they grow quick and the bees like them, so hoping to get my existing lavender to a good size in prep for that in the mid-summer.

Also bought some rooting hormone. What can I use it for? I've heard it only works on plants that reproduce asexually. I have two hydrangeas on their second year, so I'm guessing I can cut from that. Also asiatic lilies but they are tender so might need to go in my mini-greenhouse? I thought I might have a go with the rooting compound for some of the mystery shrubs I have in the garden.

I also have two very large gaps on the borders that need large easy-care shrubs. One is dark and is full-shade. One is partial-shade. I need something cheap but quick growing. Any ideas? I was thinking buddleia in the partial shade spot, perhaps it's not sunny enough. Though my neighbours have a large buddleia which gets similar sun.

Ploshkin

Re: Greenthumbing for Spring!
« Reply #42 on: April 10, 2017, 22:36:04 PM »
Shrubs for full shade are difficult as they are largely uninteresting.  Snowberry gets white or pink berries.  Laurels grow in shade, there are some with yellow spotted leaves.  Mahonia has interesting sprays of late season flowers (loved by bees) but the leaves are holly like and prickly.  Plain green but quite exotic looking is Fatsia Japonica (castor oil plant) which grows in shade.  There are also varieties of Euonymus that tolerate shade.
Buddleia are  fine in partial shade - a good one is Buddleia Globosa that has balls of bright orange flowers.
« Last Edit: April 10, 2017, 22:38:23 PM by Ploshkin »
Life's too short for ironing.

Francesca

Re: Greenthumbing for Spring!
« Reply #43 on: April 11, 2017, 09:28:35 AM »
Shrubs for full shade are difficult as they are largely uninteresting.  Snowberry gets white or pink berries.  Laurels grow in shade, there are some with yellow spotted leaves.  Mahonia has interesting sprays of late season flowers (loved by bees) but the leaves are holly like and prickly.  Plain green but quite exotic looking is Fatsia Japonica (castor oil plant) which grows in shade.  There are also varieties of Euonymus that tolerate shade.
Buddleia are  fine in partial shade - a good one is Buddleia Globosa that has balls of bright orange flowers.

Thanks! I don't mind if it's very uninteresting, I just want to fill the gap.

b15erk

Re: Greenthumbing for Spring!
« Reply #44 on: April 11, 2017, 09:38:02 AM »
Hydrangea are one of my favourites, they fill a gap very quickly.  Pieris, looking spectacular atm.  Love the Buddleia Globosa with the orange flowers (want one), the others can get very big.

Be careful about self seeding, as this can cause a lot of work, my buddleias, and Rose of Sharon grow seedlings everywhere.

Jessie
Jessie, who is very happy to be here!!  :),  but who has far too many sewing machines to be healthy, and a fabric stash which is becoming embarrassing.