The Sewing Place

RUBYLOCK R-L5 TYPE 4 STRAND OVERLOCK SEWING MACHINE ATTACHMENT

dafyddcoch

I've just purchased a Rubylock R-L5 Type 4 strand overloclock attachment for my Jones CBD electric powered machine that I've fitted to an old Singer treadle table/bench. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/264739439789  I'm a novice machine user (towels, curtains and repairs thus-far) and about to start making a kimono jacket for my wife), so it'll be likely ages before I am skilled enough to use it but I got it because it does effectively turn a straight stitch machine into an overlocker. It manages this by incorporating the stitch and cotton of the sewing machine with the thread and action of the overlocker.

Does anyone have any experience of such a contraption? Are they any good? I'll only want to use it now and again so the faff of setting it up isn't a problem and whilst I'm guessing it isn't made to be used all day every day, I'm hoping it'll be invaluable when I do need an overlocker.   

Also, how difficult is it to use an overlocker compared to a machine. I'm usually good with machinery generally, be it agricultural, building, engineering etc. and am happy to play for a while with scrap and learn if possible. Or is it as I suspect and I should store it for now and become more proficient with my machine first?

Thanks/diolch
 cadwch yn ddiogel/stay safe


KayK

Re: RUBYLOCK R-L5 TYPE 4 STRAND OVERLOCK SEWING MACHINE ATTACHMENT
« Reply #1 on: May 29, 2020, 09:05:31 AM »
Wow!  That certainly is an interesting bit of kit - never heard of/seen one of those before, so would love to see it set up and working!

Overlockers are pretty easy to use - they are just a little tricky to thread, but once you get the hang of them, they are fine.  They seem to suffer less glitches than sewing machines - I have had mine for 20 odd years and it has never misbehaved.  The only thing i can say is they needed cleaning almost every time you use them as they seem to create an awful lot of fluff (especially if you use the cutter!)

Good luck!
I just love sewing!

BrendaP

Re: RUBYLOCK R-L5 TYPE 4 STRAND OVERLOCK SEWING MACHINE ATTACHMENT
« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2020, 10:21:26 AM »
Proper overockers have two or three needles and two looper threads which interlock with the needle threads wrapping right around the edge of the fabric which has just been cut by the blade in front of the needles.

That attachment
https://vintagesewingmachinesblog.wordpress.com/2018/09/21/overlock-for-sewing-machines/
appears to be controlling looper threads which interact with the spool and bobbin threads of the machine and like all the bigger attachments is controlled by a fork which fits over the needle clamp and so goes up and down with the needle.

The one thing that it doesn't appear to have is a knife to cut the fabric just ahead of the loopers.  That means that yu would have to be very accurate with placing the two layers of fabric together.  On a proper overlocker if the two layers are not perfectly lined up the bits trimmed off a different widths.

I guess it will turn out like a lot of gadgets, love-it or hate-it, but until you have it with you and can sit down and try using it you won't know.

A general limitation of proper overlockers is that they can only sew very gentle curves; because of the two, sometimes three, needles sitting side by side.  I can't really see from the illustrations whether or not this would be any better.

Please keep us updated about how you get on with it.
Brenda.  My machines are: Corona, a 1953 Singer 201K-3, Caroline, a 1940 Singer 201K-3, Thirza, 1949 Singer 221K, Azilia, 1957 Singer 201K-MK2 and Vera, a Husqvarna 350 SewEasy about 20 years old. Also Bernina 1150 overlocker and Elna 444 Coverstitcher.
http://paternoster.orpheusweb.co.

dafyddcoch

Re: RUBYLOCK R-L5 TYPE 4 STRAND OVERLOCK SEWING MACHINE ATTACHMENT
« Reply #3 on: May 29, 2020, 11:10:46 AM »

The one thing that it doesn't appear to have is a knife to cut the fabric just ahead of the loopers.  That means that yu would have to be very accurate with placing the two layers of fabric together.  On a proper overlocker if the two layers are not perfectly lined up the bits trimmed off a different widths.

HI and thanks for the information.I think you're correct in that it doesn't have knives to trim the material. I guess I'll have to be uber careful about cutting out and pinning before I start to overlock/sew. I'm assuming it'll be a faff to set-up but it will allow me to finish things off neatly in I'm not lining a garment. and also play around with contrasting thread colours for decorative finishing off. It is made by a Toyota company (which gave a little confidence) so I'm hoping that it'll at least be well made and half-decent to use and anyway, I like machinery and mechanical things generally so was fascinated by it. Thanks again.