The Sewing Place

Do I need a french curve or a Dressmakers ruler

Kenora

Re: Do I need a french curve or a Dressmakers ruler
« Reply #15 on: July 03, 2020, 21:33:30 PM »
I have a patternmaster which is metric, and I use a lot, but I also have a French curve which is imperial - and I find this much better because my mind works in imperial. :) I bought the patternmaster first but it never occurred to me at the time that metric would be annoying.
Minding my P's & Q's in Portreath

Irishseahorse

Re: Do I need a french curve or a Dressmakers ruler
« Reply #16 on: July 04, 2020, 08:43:56 AM »
Thanks guys, really helpful feedback. I love the fact that the first post suggests I get both and the second post suggests neither! This sums up dressmaking in a nutshell for me as a novice! I think it's my mathematical background where something is either right or wrong, but in dressmaking there's not always a 'right' answer, drives me bonkers!

Still, we learn from the mistakes right? The video is very helpful and clearly explains the benefits of using a curve. I think I'm just going to have to start experimenting. Anyone have any other resources for making your own patterns or adjusting existing patterns? There's so much I don't know!

Thank you all for sharing your insights. I'll let you know how I get on.
If at first you don't succeed, something something..... basically don't give up


Kwaaked

Re: Do I need a french curve or a Dressmakers ruler
« Reply #18 on: July 04, 2020, 08:55:31 AM »
I'll be honest, I use the Dritz Styling Design Ruler more then anything else, and I have all the tools.
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dritz-Styling-Design-Ruler-White/dp/B001BDEOVG/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=dritz+styling+design+ruler&qid=1593848959&sr=8-1

I find this, and L square and the one that Suzy Furrer sold to be the ones I use most.  The larger rulers come out most for formals because they're sometimes a bit unwieldy.

I'll also be honest, I use Imperial and metric interchangeably, so I never pay much attention to the markings, it is what's on it and I go as it says.  Oh I need 2" here, or 5 CM...to me it doesn't matter much.  Half my tools are one or the other (depending on ease of finding them, and in the US that is usually Imperial), but then my education is in metric.

Ohsewsimple

Re: Do I need a french curve or a Dressmakers ruler
« Reply #19 on: July 04, 2020, 11:58:58 AM »
My Sew Easy ruler is pretty much the same @Kwaaked and I love it for curved hems and side seams.  It was a present from my tutor but it’s imperial so don’t use it a lot for measuring.   I can use inches and like you often go from one to the other but generally use metric. 

Kwaaked

Re: Do I need a french curve or a Dressmakers ruler
« Reply #20 on: July 04, 2020, 12:13:06 PM »
That's okay, I was making a pattern for masks for my DD, DH and MIL (and my Aunt in law for that matter) in 3 different styles/sizes and one side of my ruler is metric and the other Imperial.  I'd set it down, pick it up and use it.

I am also left handed, so for some unknown reason, I kept putting it to the right.

Every time I picked it up, I went to a different side so each line is a guess on which measurement I used.

@Ohsewsimple I'm the opposite.  I grew up with Imperial pretty much only, so I revert to it generally.  Except when I am using European drafting stuff.  And men's wear, since all I did learn was metric in that and to be honest, tailoring in metric seems to be better then Imperial. 

Irishseahorse

Re: Do I need a french curve or a Dressmakers ruler
« Reply #21 on: July 05, 2020, 09:40:37 AM »
Thank you on and all. Finally took the plunge this morning and bought a pack that contains a right angle, ruler, french curve and a couple of other curves. It's a cheap set, but I figure I'll see what I use the most and get a better quality later. I also bought the book that @Efemera suggested. I think that will propbably be more helpful than most of the curves. Thanks again for your insights!
If at first you don't succeed, something something..... basically don't give up

Missie

Re: Do I need a french curve or a Dressmakers ruler
« Reply #22 on: July 05, 2020, 11:21:05 AM »
The best and easiest pattern drafting book for beginners is this one..
https://www.amazon.co.uk/Metric-Pattern-Cutting-Womens-Wear/dp/1444335057/ref=asc_df_1444335057/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=311325854090&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=7294146727323510129&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9073602&hvtargid=pla-332578074636&psc=1&th=1&psc=1

Ok, I'm going to add to the there is no-right-or-wrong answer.  But I hate Winnie.  I learnt to pattern cut using Helen Stanley. I then moved to children's pattern cutting, which meant Winnie and it was by far a less easy book to follow.  Helen Stanley is laid out well, and clear to follow, much more user-friendly than Winnie.

The other one that gets high praise is Natalie Bray.
A measly 2.5m of stash used so far!

Kwaaked

Re: Do I need a french curve or a Dressmakers ruler
« Reply #23 on: July 05, 2020, 17:28:53 PM »
You're right, @Missie there isn't a right or wrong answer to drafting and tools.  Even here, we all use a variety. 

As to systems, I use a men's wear book from Italy (I have a copy of the book the old man had in Men of the Cloth documentary, Moda Aloi - Il Taglio del sarto moderno ca. 1933 and use that one to draft men's wear for the most part...I learned the German Muller und Sohn so menswear is centered totally in European methods), learned Helen Armstrong in school and use a cross of Connie Crawford, Furrer, Alderich and Soviet Era methods (weird cross of Euro-American methods) and draping didn't hit home (Armstrong) until I started watching Nick Verreos on You Tube, University of Fashion  and got a cross of books from the 40s-70s.

We all find what works best in what we do, even with tools.

@Irishseahorse I have the Fairgate Fashion carry all from Wawak, which I needed for school and I use the half size L square and cuff ruler from it.  I use the vary forms in other tools and the french curve I use the smaller one from Lutterloh more then this one.  Tools are a lot like systems: we all find what works best for what we are doing.