The Sewing Place

Tracing paper

JudyN

Tracing paper
« on: September 13, 2020, 19:49:23 PM »
After fighting with my second muslin for Jalie Eleonores and discovering along the way that I have a full, low-slung bum and I need to let them out further than the sea allowances would allow, I'd like to trace the pattern onto paper and do a 'proper' adjustment rather than my usual 'guess and bodge it' approach. I've never done this before so I don't know if some tracing paper is better than others, and whether to go for one with dots or lines. Any recommendations please?

UttaRetch

Re: Tracing paper
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2020, 19:59:41 PM »
I'm waiting for Swedish tracing paper.  Dot and dash is not good for me as it's not translucent enough.
What goes around comes around.

Efemera

Re: Tracing paper
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2020, 21:54:14 PM »
Burda tracing paper

BrendaP

Re: Tracing paper
« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2020, 21:57:26 PM »
I inherited a couple of big rolls of tracing paper from my dad; he was a draftsman and designed big air-conditioning projects.  Not much left now.   :(   It's quite stiff and thick but very translucent.  I think the Swedish stuff is softer.

Fifty years ago when I left school I worked in a lab testing papers and boards and it was called vegetable parchment.  It's like baking parchment but thicker, but there's no reason why you couldn't use baking parchment (grease proof paper) although much of it now is brown rather than white.

Dots and crosses is 'ordinary' paper with the dots and crosses printed on it.  Used for drafting patterns from scratch; the dots and crosses are less intrusive than fully gridded graph paper, but being opaque it's no good for tracing.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2020, 22:00:41 PM by BrendaP »
Brenda.  My machines are: Corona, a 1953 Singer 201K-3, Caroline, a 1940 Singer 201K-3, Thirza, 1949 Singer 221K, Azilia, 1957 Singer 201K-MK2 and Vera, a Husqvarna 350 SewEasy about 20 years old. Also Bernina 1150 overlocker and Elna 444 Coverstitcher.
http://paternoster.orpheusweb.co.

Kwaaked

Re: Tracing paper
« Reply #4 on: September 14, 2020, 05:30:56 AM »
And I use a smooth wheel and graphite paper on newspaper rolls to trace.

One of the advantages for me is cost and ease: it's cheap enough and I can find it easier then tracing paper and specialty stuff.

annieeg

Re: Tracing paper
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2020, 09:36:43 AM »
I've used Swedish tracing paper which is good for trial and error fitting because you can actually stitch it if required.  I'm stingy with it though as it's not cheap. :\

wrenkins

Re: Tracing paper
« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2020, 09:39:59 AM »
I don't have experience in any other type but I use Swedish having seen the recommendations on here. I got a deal on three rolls but I can't remember where. Pretty useless me  :laughing: I can tell you it's brilliant though.  :thumbsup:
Harbouring resentment is like swallowing poison and waiting for the other person to die!

Vezelay

Re: Tracing paper
« Reply #7 on: September 14, 2020, 10:01:17 AM »
Another here for the Swedish despite the high cost of delivery to Ireland. I've tried cheaper kinds but come back to this. I've never actually used it for fitting but as @annieeg says, you can. I usually buy mine from https://www.patterntrace.com/ but Plush Addict and Barnyarns sell it too.

JudyN

Re: Tracing paper
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2020, 10:05:49 AM »
Thank you all - Swedish it shall be :D

Gernella

Re: Tracing paper
« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2020, 10:09:18 AM »
First time I ever used it, it was some labelled Kwik Sew and had dots on, great for lining up.  No longer available.  I got a sample of Swedish, which seemed a bit more denser, so when it was about run out bought some.  At the moment still stuck in the corner unused, unwrapped.  I think there is 10 meters on which I will never use, so if anybody is ever short and can't get it (which might happen at the end of the year), you are very welcome to have half.

 
Stash extension 2021 - 1.5 meters
Left at the end of 2020 - 47.5 meters

JudyN

Re: Tracing paper
« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2020, 10:59:44 AM »
@Gernella, if you're sure you won't use it, I'd happily take it off your hands - and pay for it, of course. 

Gernella

Re: Tracing paper
« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2020, 12:11:41 PM »
Thanks @JudyN, can't remember how much I paid for it but not that bothered about the money.  I can certainly let you have half of it, but don't hold your breath for getting it quickly, I'm hoping to start decorating this week so sewing will have to take a back seat until I've finished.  I'll also have to fold it if that's okay.

In another life I would be upstairs and split it straight away but things move more slowly now.
Stash extension 2021 - 1.5 meters
Left at the end of 2020 - 47.5 meters

JudyN

Re: Tracing paper
« Reply #12 on: September 14, 2020, 13:45:41 PM »
Not to worry @Gernella - I'm keen to get going asap and don't want to add to your jobs list, so will order some paper online. Thanks again for the very kind offer though <3

UttaRetch

Re: Tracing paper
« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2020, 13:49:41 PM »
I usually buy mine from https://www.patterntrace.com/ but Plush Addict and Barnyarns sell it too.
I was shocked that Plush addict wanted to charge me something like £7 p&p, so I went direct to Patterns trace and two 10 metre rolls cost £27 with free delivery.
What goes around comes around.

Marniesews

Re: Tracing paper
« Reply #14 on: September 14, 2020, 15:47:38 PM »
Dots and crosses is 'ordinary' paper with the dots and crosses printed on it.  Used for drafting patterns from scratch; the dots and crosses are less intrusive than fully gridded graph paper, but being opaque it's no good for tracing.

My eyesight isn't great these days, I need the highest magnification in supermarket reading glasses and have invested in a few daylight & LED lamps to help with sewing in general - especially all the black on black that I do. Nevertheless I do manage to use this paper to trace pretty well with a decent light when needed. I don't have many of the fine brownish tissue paper patterns generally which would certainly be a struggle on a brown wooden table but for anything like that I put a white piece of card or table cloth below those and that makes a big difference. Using pencil to trace rather than pen helps as well, for me at least a line of pen seems to distract the eyes by focussing them firmly on the surface of the top paper rather than on the line below it.

I also have a lot of Jalie Patterns which vary between B&W and coloured lines on a robust white paper and those are no problem.
Stash Busting 2020
Goal: 50m
So far: 6m fabric; approx 40m crin (horsehair braid)