The Sewing Place

Bias cut dress

jen

Bias cut dress
« on: October 30, 2020, 07:25:27 AM »
I’m passing on this little tip in case it is useful - the awfully slippery satin I am using for a trial run of a dress for Dd was tamed by drawing round the pattern pieces on the fabric, chopping across the length roughly, then machining round the chalk lines before cutting the pieces. I did this to stop it stretching before assembling. I’ll keep you posted on how it behaves when it’s all together, the CF seam stitched so far ( with very slight zigzag) behaved perfectly. Fingers crossed for the zip. Any other tips For bias welcome.

UttaRetch

Re: Bias cut dress
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2020, 07:59:20 AM »
I draw around the patterns onto the fabric for cutting out, but I don't sew anything from Satan's fabric cupboard.  I'm sure you can do it.
What goes around comes around.

BrendaP

Re: Bias cut dress
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2020, 09:18:55 AM »
The last time I tried sewing bias cut satin  :devil: it went into the bin. :(
I'm sure yours will be better controlled.
Brenda.  My machines are: Corona, a 1953 Singer 201K-3, Caroline, a 1940 Singer 201K-3, Thirza, 1949 Singer 221K, Azilia, 1957 Singer 201K-MK2 and Vera, a Husqvarna 350 SewEasy about 20 years old. Also Bernina 1150 overlocker and Elna 444 Coverstitcher.
http://paternoster.orpheusweb.co.

jen

Re: Bias cut dress
« Reply #3 on: October 31, 2020, 12:09:46 PM »
I had a good chuckle at these comments, BrendaP and UttaRetch. Luckily, this satin wasn’t expensive, so if it’s a flop I won’t weep.

elisep

Re: Bias cut dress
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2020, 20:48:20 PM »
I recently made a couple of face masks in silk satin (masks are still mandatory where I live and probably will be into summer, I’m getting bad “maskne”)

I tried the trick of soaking in gelatine and I must say, it’s an absolute revelation! Makes it so much easier to sew. You just need to be able to rinse out the gelatine once your item is finished, so might not be suitable for every application. You will go through a lot of gelatine though, I used powdered, haven’t tried the gelatine leaves. I assume gelatine substitutes will work just as well for any vegetarians not keen on using the real deal.
I used the instructions here
« Last Edit: November 03, 2020, 09:01:18 AM by Acorn »
Stash Busting 2020
Goal: 50 metres
Used: 19.5 metres

Starryfish

Re: Bias cut dress
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2020, 21:28:40 PM »
my tip for handling bias cut fabric is to lie down in a darkened room until the impulse goes away. I don't seem to have the frame for wearing it anyway. Wrap blouses slither unflatteringly around my bony chest and skirts just cling to those bits I would rather conceal.
Stash reducing 2020
Stash- 65m
Gone so far - 37m

UttaRetch

Re: Bias cut dress
« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2020, 07:47:27 AM »
 :laughing:  :laughing:  :laughing:
What goes around comes around.

UttaRetch

Re: Bias cut dress
« Reply #7 on: November 03, 2020, 08:19:40 AM »
I recently made a couple of face masks in silk satin (masks are still mandatory where I live and probably will be into summer, I’m getting bad “maskne”)

I tried the trick of soaking in gelatine and used the instructions here
@elisep, the link is misdirecting and might have been co-opted.
What goes around comes around.

Acorn

Re: Bias cut dress
« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2020, 09:01:52 AM »
I've corrected the link - it had an extra http://  :thumbsup:
I might look as though I'm talking to you, but inside my head I'm sewing.

jen

Re: Bias cut dress
« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2020, 13:52:36 PM »
2nd go at a reply, tinternet swallowed it! @Starryfish :laughing: :laughing: too funny. Satin is never my fabric of choice, but Dd is eager to try. This run is in cheap stuff, to see if I can work around the problem of the style she wants usually working better on someone who isn’t a D cup. She wants waist definition, but, you know, classic darts on the bias  :facepalm:. Either the mark 2 will be ok, or I will need to redraft and see if I can angle a dart in along straight grain from hip to bust, (which we called a French dart )