The Sewing Place

Mr Twingo's Singer 95K40

Mr Twingo

Mr Twingo's Singer 95K40
« on: October 31, 2020, 20:06:33 PM »
Spotted on eBay with no bids, and located just a short distance away, I put in a 'best offer' for this lovely machine. Offer accepted! Collected it this morning. Serial number EF197494, manufactured on 27th July 1949.

The plan had been to give it a little TLC, patch up any scars, and sell it on, but it's such a perfect size that I'm going to keep it. It's not a black machine like the one @Roger has, but a silvery colour, much like some Brother industrial models from the 1970s.

Here are a few photos:

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Roger

Re: Mr Twingo's Singer 95K40
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2020, 20:47:12 PM »
I love how cute these machines are! but they're beasts... they are so rounded and well proportioned its easy to over look how big they are and they really are big! and can manage something like 3500 Stitches per minute... which is terrifying.

Hope you enjoy it and can get it stitching nicely soon!
A bit of a vintage sewing machine nut! Singers: 500a, 401g, 48k Elnas: lotus SP & grasshopper, Bernina 530-2 F+R 504, Pfaff 30, Cresta T-132

Mr Twingo

Re: Mr Twingo's Singer 95K40
« Reply #2 on: November 01, 2020, 09:49:34 AM »
Before I bought this beauty, I had incorrectly assumed that it was just another industrial machine, only in an attractive table, making it acceptable for use in the home.

Oh, how very wrong I was! Model 95 is a diddy little thing, and could easily be mistaken for a regular domestic machine. Small, but wickedly heavy. Perhaps it could be described as the Industrial Featherweight… Mrs Twingo can't possibly object to me keeping this one. The cupboard looks so much better than my current set up, it would be easier to clean, and reduce the clutter spread over my current workspace.

Although dusty, the machine itself it surprisingly free from dried oil stains, fluff, gunk, and all the other nasties that lurk within the mechanics. It's the cupboard that needs more attention. There are a few tacks and staples that need reseating, the laminate around the door edges has peeled off in places, and the insides are filthy. Fortunately, there didn't seem to be anything living within it.

@Roger – where do you buy your needles? And am I right in thinking normal high shank industrial presser feet should be used?
« Last Edit: November 01, 2020, 09:57:35 AM by Mr Twingo »

Mr Twingo

Re: Mr Twingo's Singer 95K40
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2020, 12:56:52 PM »
Needles… the 95K40 takes 88x1 needles (aka DAx1), whereas most industrial units take DBx1 type needles. I think the relatively simple raising of the needle bar by about 4.5mm will allow me to use the DBx1 type.

That's my task for this afternoon.

HooliganHeart

Re: Mr Twingo's Singer 95K40
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2020, 13:51:45 PM »
Very nice machine find there  :thumbsup:
1922 Singer 99K-2 / 1932 Singer 128-13 / 1946 Singer 221 / 1948 Singer 15-91 / 1960 Singer 401A / Singer 14CG754

Mr Twingo

Re: Mr Twingo's Singer 95K40
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2020, 14:48:09 PM »
That's was easy! It sews beautifully with DBx1 needles after raising the needle bar. Great news as now I'll have a greater choice of readily available needles.

Roger

Re: Mr Twingo's Singer 95K40
« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2020, 20:34:03 PM »
I think I got the needles for mine from Ebay,

but it sounds like you have it well in hand. It is a very dinky industrial, or a very sturdy 99.
A bit of a vintage sewing machine nut! Singers: 500a, 401g, 48k Elnas: lotus SP & grasshopper, Bernina 530-2 F+R 504, Pfaff 30, Cresta T-132

Sewot

Re: Mr Twingo's Singer 95K40
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2020, 23:09:51 PM »
That is an interesting and nice machine.
What does the arm at the back do?
I am guessing it operates the feed dogs as there does not appear to be a form of zig zag adjustment.

Mr Twingo

Re: Mr Twingo's Singer 95K40
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2020, 08:49:25 AM »
The arm at the back is typical of most industrial machines, and is part of the 'knee lift' mechanism. It doesn't nothing more exciting than lift the presser foot when you press against a lever with your right knee.

I've not connected the arm yet. It's on my list of things to do.

So far, I have:
• Replaced the clutch motor with a servo (Jack JK-513A)
• Altered the height of the needle bar so I can use 16x231 leather needles
• Made a speed reducer

Additional plans:
• Brace the rear of the cabinet to reduce vibration
• Add a layer of damping to reduce noise
• Make a knee lifter
• Reroute the power cable through the back or rear of the cabinet.
• Install an LED sewing light
• Pad the feet of the cabinet