The Sewing Place

Tablecloth.

Bill

Tablecloth.
« on: October 29, 2021, 14:25:18 PM »
Are they as simple to make as I think?
Basically just a big sheet with hemmed edges?
The table is rectangular in shape but the ends are rounded off, like half circles. Basically a huge drop leaf table.
I made a tarpaulin template of the tables size and shape and my plan is to add an extra foot or so for the drape and then use a rolled hem foot to finish the edge. Yes? No? What the hell were you thinking?
Brother Innov-is NV1800Q         Brother Innov-is NV870SE        Singer M2105       KPCB 201     Grumpy old git

Esme866

Re: Tablecloth.
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2021, 21:03:41 PM »
@Bill That shape of table usually requires a rectangular cloth if one is purchased as what is commonly referred to as oval can tend to hang weird on the ends. However, since you are making this one, you have the opportunity to mimic the actual shape. A 12" drop is my favorite - long enough to hang nicely, yet doesn't get in the way with sitting.

As for hems, I usually only do 2 kinds. For more casual cloths I do a double turned 1/4" shirt tail hem, hand basted in place first and then machine stitched like a shirt tail or - for more formal cloths, I do a 3" drapery hem. That's a 3" double turned hem to add weight for hanging and then hand hemmed to make the stitches invisible. I usually only do this with heavier fabric which means I make the cloth fitted for square cornered tables only. I did make a round cloth once that used a 2-1/2" facing, attached with the machine, turned and pressed. This was for a 20"diameter night table.

As for machine stitched, overcast rolled hems on store bought cloths - I bring those home, cut them off and redo a 1/4" double turn. I just think those hems look cheap and they don't hang as nicely. But that's just my interior design background coming thru.

BrendaP

Re: Tablecloth.
« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2021, 10:34:01 AM »
I concur with all that @Esme866 says.

What is the table used for?  IME poly-cotton sheeting is fine for small occasional tables but if it's a dining table you really want something a bit heavier; look at furnishing fabrics. 

Anything with a curved hem should have a narrow hem, but if the fabric is thick you might not be able to get it as narrow as 1/4 inch.  The fabric itself will tell you how narrow you can go.

If it's a very big table and the width of the fabric is not enough to allow sufficient drop all round don't have one seam in the middle, have the full width down the middle with narrower strips along each side - but best not to have a seam at all.
Brenda.  My machines are: Corona, a 1953 Singer 201K-3, Caroline, a 1940 Singer 201K-3, Thirza, 1949 Singer 221K, Azilia, 1957 Singer 201K-MK2 and Vera, a Husqvarna 350 SewEasy about 20 years old. Also Bernina 1150 overlocker and Elna 444 Coverstitcher.
http://paternoster.orpheusweb.co.

Bill

Re: Tablecloth.
« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2021, 15:13:42 PM »
Thanks for the replies ladies.
The tablecloth is wanted primarily for displaying bodyshop products on She hosts 'house parties' for friends/customers etc. She may use it on a more permanent basis but as far as I know, the table is rarely used for it's intended purpose...dining on.
I've not a clue about fabric weight but heres a linky to it....
https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07VVRYQ8R/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Brother Innov-is NV1800Q         Brother Innov-is NV870SE        Singer M2105       KPCB 201     Grumpy old git

BrendaP

Re: Tablecloth.
« Reply #4 on: October 30, 2021, 16:32:00 PM »
If I were making it, and the fabric is wide enough, I'd do the elipse shape (technically an egg is oval, two semi circles with a straight bit in the middle is an elipse) and just a plain narrow hem 1/4"-1/2" wide.  If you think it might be used on different tables then take the easy option amd make it rectanular.
Brenda.  My machines are: Corona, a 1953 Singer 201K-3, Caroline, a 1940 Singer 201K-3, Thirza, 1949 Singer 221K, Azilia, 1957 Singer 201K-MK2 and Vera, a Husqvarna 350 SewEasy about 20 years old. Also Bernina 1150 overlocker and Elna 444 Coverstitcher.
http://paternoster.orpheusweb.co.

Esme866

Re: Tablecloth.
« Reply #5 on: October 31, 2021, 01:07:44 AM »
Typically display tables are covered to the floor, often with a separate skirt, but if this is in home, a 10"-12" drop should suffice.

The only thing that would concern me is wrinkling. Some 100% cotton is okay and some is dreadful. A polyester blend would work better for both wrinkling and colorfastness.

By "bodyshop" I'm thinking you probably mean cosmetics/lotions? This side of the pond that would be paints, waxes and such for your automobile. :)

Also, its tempting to leave the selvedges on the cloth when making quick tablecloths and curtains, but it's usually best to trim them as they can have a tendency to shrink during laundering. However you may not want to toss the trimmings. I use them in place of cotton twill tape when needed for stabilizing a seam. The selvedges of shirting fabric/sheeting make a great twill tape when stabilizing the front edge of a tailored jacket- especially since in this country- you can't just run out to a store and grab some when you need it. :thumbsup: