The Sewing Place

Old Rusty

Sandra

Old Rusty
« on: February 09, 2018, 11:29:37 AM »
I found this in our attic and brought it down sometime last year.



It's had no case on it and it hadn't even got any sort of protective wrap over it. I have no idea how long it's been up there...poor thing.  :(

Our roof isn't very good, so it was filthy...covered in dust and dirt and going rusty.
The wheel turns, (tried it gently) and things are moving on the machine. I've no idea what I intend to do with it, ( a bit of oil would probably be a good start) but feel much better for bringing it out of the attic. I still fondly remember the old black, hand, Singer sewing machines from school.

I assume it would have belonged to my ex-OH's grandmother. The family moved into this house when it was built 1948ish, and it's been lived in by the family ever since.

The number on the machine is V577188.
Is it worth tinkering with and bringing back to life? Are they easy to tinker with? I've never messed about with stuff like this before.

Can I be bothered?

Thought some of you might be interested to see it.

Sandra.
xxx

b15erk

Re: Old Rusty
« Reply #1 on: February 09, 2018, 11:38:09 AM »
Sandra, it's very soothing bringing an old machine back to life.  I have a couple which are in worse condition than your, but one day....

Lots of oil, plenty of coaxing, and a good look at Helen Howes website for spare parts!

Have a go - you know you want to!  We may yet tempt you to dabble with VSM's!

Jessie

Jessie, who is very happy to be here!!  :),  but who has far too many sewing machines to be healthy, and a fabric stash which is becoming embarrassing.

StitchinTime

Re: Old Rusty
« Reply #2 on: February 09, 2018, 11:40:29 AM »
According to the serial number, it is a 28K from 1908 (http://ismacs.net/singer_sewing_machine_company/serial-numbers/singer-v-series-serial-numbers.html).

As to whether to tinker with it, it depends on whether you want it to be functional or decorative. It is missing the front shuttle cover; if it is also missing the shuttle holder and any shuttles, it may be expensive to get it running again.

Sandra

Re: Old Rusty
« Reply #3 on: February 09, 2018, 12:11:19 PM »
It's quite old then? I wonder where it came from, because that's from a previous generation to my late grandma-in-law. I like old stuff. I get this from my Dad.

I have the shuttle cover...I'd slid it off as I was wiping it off, and there's a shuttle inside.  :)

It'd be lovely to see it working again, but the question is...can I be ars...bothered?

Sandra.
xxx

Roger

Re: Old Rusty
« Reply #4 on: February 09, 2018, 13:10:24 PM »
You might be surprised by how little effort it is to get it back to sewing.
A bit of a vintage sewing machine nut! Singers: 500a, 401g, 48k Elnas: lotus SP & grasshopper, Bernina 530-2 F+R 504, Pfaff 30, Cresta T-132

arrow

Re: Old Rusty
« Reply #5 on: February 09, 2018, 13:23:33 PM »
Oh, yes you should bother  :P

The rust comes off with fine steel wool and some polishes are much better than others. Even if flaking chrome never will shine up again, the steel under does with the right polish. I like Pol Metal polish, Quick-Glo (probably a favorite for this). Autosol is acceptable too. They are thicker pastes, and better than the Brasso and Mr Muscle products I have tried (they work well for silver and brass though). This is of course on only for metal parts like chrome plates, needle and presser, bar, outer part of the hand wheel etc.

I usually clean the black shellac with microfiber cloths, and  shine up with Auto Glym super resin polish. If there's still a good layer of shellac over the decals it works very well. Gold decals are the most delicate on the machine and easily get's damage if harshly cleaned.

Is the shuttle still with the machine? Helen Howes shop is the place to call for replacement parts. The advantages with model 28 is that needle and replacement long bobbins can be found. At least two people I know of have said their 28 is their best top stitcher, neatest precision stitching. Yet a couple of others have set it up with a buttonholer.

For the mechanical internals, oil, fine steel wool, metal polish, loads of cotton buds and wipe excess oil off, and repeat for the next few weeks. There's good info on the 28 if you like reading blogs and watch youtube videos.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2018, 16:24:51 PM by arrow »

Sandra

Re: Old Rusty
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2018, 19:26:42 PM »
Thanks for that, arrow...I've just watched the two Lizzie Lenard videos.  :)

I'm tempted to have a go at cleaning this and see what happens.....coincidentally, Lizzie's from Wolverhampton, which is about 3 miles from me. My accent's nothing like hers.
(She mentions where she's from in the comments)

Lots of bits which will need to be detached  :[
I hope I don't end up with a box full of vintage sewing machine parts which I don't know how to reattach.

Sandra.
xxx

arrow

Re: Old Rusty
« Reply #7 on: February 09, 2018, 20:07:52 PM »
If you take one part of the machine at a time it will not be a problem; clean behind the face plate and tape the screw to the lid if you have others off at the same time (like the slide plates and throat plate). Take the tensioner appart and back together as a separate job. Some screws are very similar but not exactly the same size, it's easier not the get them mixed up. It will be easy when you get to know the machine better. There's a lot of rust on yours that need to come off.

Sandra

Re: Old Rusty
« Reply #8 on: February 10, 2018, 08:10:51 AM »
I have just applied oil to the rusty screws  :)

I've not tried to unscrew them yet, but they look like they will NEED oiling first to make life easier. I don't want to give up at the first step.

Sandra.
xxx

arrow

Re: Old Rusty
« Reply #9 on: February 10, 2018, 15:51:06 PM »
That's the best way about it, oiling, patience, gentle wiggeling, and if needed, more of the same :- )

Sandra

Re: Old Rusty
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2018, 10:36:40 AM »
Progress Report.

I oiled the screws yesterday  :angel:  and can now turn the stitch length screw, undo the cover over the feed dogs and flip open the catch to tilt the machine and look underneath....Yay! Found a dead beetle  ><

I'm still unable to undo the back cover. I'll try a bit more oil and patience. The tension bit... (thumb presser tab, apparently) looks damaged slightly...it's scraped and rough, and the spring looks bent and 'off'.
Rubber tyre is perished.
The bottom of the presser foot is rough and also the front slidey plate/cover is pitted and rough too. The back slidey plate/cover is currently refusing to budge.

So far I have only dared to remove the face plate (and presser foot)...and have happily removed some black yack. Hurrah!

I've been looking on the Helen Howes site for available bits. Rubber tyre's a definite I'm going to need.

I've been gently turning the handle today and I can't believe how good it sounds?!

Sandra.
xxx

LeilaMay

Re: Old Rusty
« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2018, 12:52:24 PM »
For screws that really wont shift, there's WD40 or TriFlow, I've used both of those. Be prepared to let them soak in, tip the machine onto it's side if necessary to let the liquid soak down into the thread or whatever  :)

There are other things - those are just the ones I have
Singers - 28K, 66K, 99K, 201K - all manual. Singers 221K (2 of 'em), 319K and 401G - electric. Bernina 730 Record, Elna Grasshopper, Husqvana 5220, Grain chainstitch toy machine, most of a Guhl & Harbeck chain stitch machine called Lyra. That's all!  :)

Roger

Re: Old Rusty
« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2018, 19:39:28 PM »
Yay! Found a dead beetle  ><

ooh a beetle - i haven't found one of those before! I did recently find an 1" high pile of lint... and 'black yak' is important you cant have a proper clean without ominous gunge.

 I also like the WD40 penetrative spray! very impressive!
A bit of a vintage sewing machine nut! Singers: 500a, 401g, 48k Elnas: lotus SP & grasshopper, Bernina 530-2 F+R 504, Pfaff 30, Cresta T-132

arrow

Re: Old Rusty
« Reply #13 on: February 12, 2018, 18:00:55 PM »
The bobbin winder might need a complete disassebly. Does the rust come off the plates?

Sandra

Re: Old Rusty
« Reply #14 on: February 12, 2018, 18:38:07 PM »
Yes. The bobbin winder looks a mess doesn't it?

I've not tried to do too much yet regarding rust removal. I don't have the right tools or polishes at the moment...my dad will be visiting tomorrow and I wanted to ask his advice.
Plus...he's possibly got a shed full of cleaning things I could use.  :)

Sandra.
xxx