The Sewing Place

Machine Embroidery virgin

datcat23

Machine Embroidery virgin
« on: March 12, 2018, 00:13:12 AM »
Hey everyone, this weekend I took delivery of my xmas present, that has been happily waiting on lay-by for me.

embroidery machine 2 by Dani, on Flickr

She's big, although a much lighter weight than I expected.  I have bought myself a big batch of embroidery threads.  Hubby gave me a selection of stabilisers for xmas, so I am pretty much set and ready to go.  The only thing we both forgot, is bobbin fill.  I have ordered a reel online, so in the meantime, I have been entertaining myself with various online tutorials. 

One thing that comes up often in the tutes, is the use of "pre-filled bobbins".   Is this a useful thing to do?  or a marketing ploy?  Should I be buying these, instead of winding my own?

Stitches

Re: Machine Embroidery virgin
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2018, 06:59:02 AM »
I wind my own.

Iminei

Re: Machine Embroidery virgin
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2018, 08:37:34 AM »
You're an embroidery Virgin???

I am 'Mary the Holy mother of God' in Embroidery terms ... Im so damn scared of the blooming thing.

I tried to wind a bobbin and somehow made a complete pigs ear of it  :S so would definitely go with prewound ...
they'll be the right tension and I think you'll get more on the bobbin!

Please could you post a linky to a decent tutorial because I can't for the life find one (Elvis is a brother 450E)
The Imperfect Perfectionist sews again

Acorn

Re: Machine Embroidery virgin
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2018, 08:56:32 AM »
You should be fine using the same thread in your bobbin as on top - as long a they're the same weight.  I use bobbin thread when I need white underneath, but not otherwise.

I've never used prewound bobbins, although I love the idea because I hate winding bobbins.  I've never found any that were specifically suitable for my machines and I know from experience that my machines tend not to like generic things.  Blooming prima donnas.

There may be something in your manual about prewound bobbins.  I seem to remember that some manufacturers don't like them.
I might look as though I'm talking to you, but inside my head I'm sewing.

datcat23

Re: Machine Embroidery virgin
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2018, 09:04:25 AM »
You're an embroidery Virgin???

I am 'Mary the Holy mother of God' in Embroidery terms ... Im so damn scared of the blooming thing.

I tried to wind a bobbin and somehow made a complete pigs ear of it  :S so would definitely go with prewound ...
they'll be the right tension and I think you'll get more on the bobbin!

Please could you post a linky to a decent tutorial because I can't for the life find one (Elvis is a brother 450E)

I suppose I have mis-quoted.  I am less a virgin, and more a gun shy embroiderer.   I have been stung badly by an embroidery machine in the past.   Many many years ago, I bought a second hand Singer Futura.  It was a combination machine; sewing and embroidery .... and it did both things badly.  That machine was the one that made me as negative as I am about combination machines, and why I bought my coverstitch as a stand alone machine, rather than one combined with an overlocker. 

I am still looking at tutes, but this one is one I checked out today:

beginner embroidery project

Iminei

Re: Machine Embroidery virgin
« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2018, 09:27:16 AM »
Thanks DC!

Well... I have just sat through that entire tut and after turning the sound down a little found it to be excellent.
The machine, tho' a different number, looks exactly like Elvis and I appreciated that that she explained why she was doing things instead of assuming that you already knew.

I will be following her tuts and tho' roses on napkins aren't my kinda things maybe a day of the dead skull would look good (always loved that design of yours @Bodgeitandscarper )

Thank you very very much DC, maybe we could go through these together?

and @Morgan, thank you for introducing me to that embroidery club of yours but I found the floods of emails and all the techhy words too difficult (at this time) to take on board. ... maybe later?

Imi
xxx
« Last Edit: March 12, 2018, 10:05:21 AM by Iminei »
The Imperfect Perfectionist sews again

Bodgeitandscarper

Re: Machine Embroidery virgin
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2018, 10:38:13 AM »
I have always used pre-wound bobbins, they are very cheap.  A bit of googling will tell you which bobbins are ok for your machine, but I think I've bought from ebay mostly.  Get the odd one that doesn't seem to play ball, but they are so cheap I just pop another one in.
 Also I can recommend the website HERE for stuff.  Her Simthreads are cheap but good, I have a full set of colours.

Iminei

Re: Machine Embroidery virgin
« Reply #7 on: March 12, 2018, 11:10:31 AM »
Sim....thread ????  :S
The Imperfect Perfectionist sews again

Bodgeitandscarper

Re: Machine Embroidery virgin
« Reply #8 on: March 12, 2018, 11:33:19 AM »
Just a brand name of embroidery threads!

Lachica

Re: Machine Embroidery virgin
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2018, 18:07:53 PM »
How exciting! I wind my own bobbins as I use white or black depending on the project. For designs where the back will be seen or where I think the bobbin thread might pull through to the top I use the same as the main embroidery colour.

Have you looked at Urban Threads designs yet? They have some funky ones.
Mary

Love2Sew

Re: Machine Embroidery virgin
« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2018, 21:48:37 PM »
Congratulations on your embroidery adventure!  In the beginning (eons ago) I wound a few bobbins then tried prewounds and have been using them ever since, currently have a Janome 500E. 

Don't use the same as the top thread unless it's something like a scarf/towels/etc where you will see both sides, even then I prefer to use a coloured prewound matched to the fabric or main embroidery colour as bobbinfil or prewounds are a very fine thread, eliminate bulk and give a better finish.

Prewounds are available in heaps of colours, just shop around for the best price, which like most things means buying in bulk, but maybe buy a small pack of 5 or so to test if you like them. 

Can I also suggest downloading this set of folders https://www.secretsof.com/content/9804 to organise your designs.  You can add/delete/rename the folders but if you don't start with some form of organising it becomes a huge task later.  Ask me how I know??   :P

Hope this helps? 
« Last Edit: March 13, 2018, 09:26:02 AM by Acorn »

Ohsewsimple

Re: Machine Embroidery virgin
« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2018, 22:54:43 PM »
I would be a bit careful with pre wounds.  They can also work out more expensive.  I just wind a load at once.  I would also  check it doesn't invalidate your guarantee. 
As far as the embroidery threads are concerned I would be very careful about buying those that appear to be 'good value'. Very often they turn out to be anything but.  I would stick to well known brands like Gutermann and Madeira.  @Bodgeitandscarper if the Sim threads work for you that's great but they don't always!   :S

Morgan

Re: Machine Embroidery virgin
« Reply #12 on: March 12, 2018, 23:17:37 PM »
I wind my own.
Not keen on pre- wounds for my machine (it cost way too much money for me to risk the cardboard type).   If I had a multi-needle machine it would probably make sense, likewise for a commercial enterprise.
My machine has a separate bobbin winder so I wind bobbins whilst supervising / monitoring the machine whilst it's stitching the designs.  It doesn't take long to wind 6 or 7 bobbins at a time.


Generally, 60wt bobbin thread / bobbinfill / bottom thread  (white, black or grey) used with 40 wt Rayon embroidery thread or 40 wt Polyester thread.

It's worth finding a bobbin thread that is even and smooth, not lumpy or hairy, even if it costs a little more than some of the 'bargain' offerings.


Suggest learning the ropes with rayon 40s and when you're happy with hooping, matching stabiliser to fabric, needle sizes, trouble shooting, and working with a range of fabrics and two or three embroidery styles, then try a range of polyesters. 


No need to go bonkers with a full range of colours early on - it's worth trying out spools from different brands to see which you prefer.  Later on you'll have a better idea of the shades you like to use most often.  There will be the ones you use most often and several that you use occasionally.  No point in spending money on lots of shades you rarely use if ever.


Same goes for stabilisers - try out the starter packs from different brands and choose which you like and you 'll soon discover which hoop sizes you like to use most (which can affect your choices if you buy boxes of precut stabiliser.  Mostly I use a medium cutaway from a roll (it's a wide one because I really like large designs so use the large hoops), also a nice mesh stabiliser and two types of water soluble stabilser (one for lace, cutaway etc. and a film for toppers which is usually used over a fine net to hold piled fabrics down under the stitches).  I have a small supply of a few other stabilisers - often from samples, for occasional use if needed.


Just a thought - if you plan to embroider some items of clothing for children / tots / babies then get a couple of samples of iron on backings to cover the underside of the completed embroidery and decide which you prefer.


Enjoy, enjoy, enjoy
 


« Last Edit: March 12, 2018, 23:27:08 PM by Morgan »

Bodgeitandscarper

Re: Machine Embroidery virgin
« Reply #13 on: March 13, 2018, 08:36:50 AM »
Lots of advice from people probably more experienced than me, but as a newcomer myself, I would say don't be worried about using the correct this, that, and the other, they all seem work, just some slightly better than others!  In my experience anyway! 
Just use those machines and enjoy them  0_0

Acorn

Re: Machine Embroidery virgin
« Reply #14 on: March 13, 2018, 08:42:42 AM »
Bodge is right - my machine was supposed to come with samples of stabiliser and thread but it didn't.  I wasn't waiting for days to use it, so my first pieces were done with no stabiliser and ordinary sewing thread.  They were surprisingly OK!

Your first pieces are unlikely to be masterpieces, and it's much more important initially to just get used to the machine and stop being scared of it! 
« Last Edit: March 13, 2018, 08:45:04 AM by Acorn »
I might look as though I'm talking to you, but inside my head I'm sewing.