The Sewing Place

Walking Foot

Lolli

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #15 on: April 17, 2018, 23:50:16 PM »
This may well be a daft question but do you keep the walking foot on your machines for sewing most things or just certain fabrics?
When you get to the end and realise your bobbin ran out at the beginning....

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Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #16 on: April 18, 2018, 00:18:51 AM »
I have a walking foot for my Singer 201, it's a straight stitch only model and doesn't have the overlock and over cast patterns you might want on jersey. I use it mostly when sewing layers of fabric, if they aren't pinned well enough or very slippery they might sort of go out of alignment. The attachment goes on when needed, and comes off for regular jobs.

I have an old Singer 99 I can sew light weight  jersey, even flimsy viscose-cotton-elastane blends. It's the most basic machine possible, straight stitch only, but when I lower the presser bar tension it stitches most fabrics with out any fuzz. It doesn't stretch the fabric or act up when other macines have. I think it might have something to do with the narrow foot too, I'm not sure. I haven't found a very good explanation for it since most other machines are much more advanced, with all kinds of functions and features in comparison. My point is really, if you play around with settings, perhaps baste by hand, or use more pins there might be away round it. The advantage with an overlocker is mostly the multiple needle stitch patterns with more loops and threads are different to basic machine. An overlocker can act up in much the same ways as the basic sewing machine, especially with slippery strechy fabrics.
« Last Edit: April 18, 2018, 00:46:53 AM by arrow »

Marniesews

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #17 on: April 18, 2018, 02:12:28 AM »
...do you keep the walking foot on your machines for sewing most things or just certain fabrics?

I don't use it as much for wovens which accounts for the lesser part of my sewing but pretty well keep it on there permanently for stretch. I can't use it in combination with other feet, of course, so that's when I sometimes revert to my big Pfaff.
Aka Jacky F in a former life...

fajita

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #18 on: April 18, 2018, 07:52:54 AM »
My walking foot came with my sewing machine, as part of the package.

I use it when using several layers of fabric at once, or when sewing pvc backed type materials.

I use it on an as need basis, I don't keep it attached all the time.

Lolli

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #19 on: April 18, 2018, 08:23:38 AM »
Great thank you, I'm going to shop for one tonight 👍
When you get to the end and realise your bobbin ran out at the beginning....

Iminei

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #20 on: April 18, 2018, 08:36:28 AM »
This may well be a daft question but do you keep the walking foot on your machines for sewing most things or just certain fabrics?

I have done this on The Splurgess ...once.

I left it on after a days sewing, came to it the next day and turned her on ...

Now the Splurgess does a series of movements when first switched on ... think someone doing warming up stretches before exercising ... and she didn't like it one bit ... she made a terrible noise and flashed up various error messages which basically amounted to ...Dont ever leave that F*** foot on me overnight again ... so now I don't!

(or at least if I find I have, I remove the foot before waking her up!)

She's fine with the integrated WF that came with her (a much slimmer foot)... but the standard WF is too bulky and doesn't allow her to do her stretches properly.
The Imperfect Perfectionist sews again

Lolli

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #21 on: April 18, 2018, 09:47:54 AM »
Haha! Enough said.....remove the foot  0_0
When you get to the end and realise your bobbin ran out at the beginning....

Lolli

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #22 on: April 18, 2018, 18:45:09 PM »
Bought one! Got a genuine Janome WF and found the best price from SMD. I know their customer service is great so I'm happy  :D
When you get to the end and realise your bobbin ran out at the beginning....

Lolli

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #23 on: April 23, 2018, 18:58:10 PM »
So the foot has arrived and all I can say is thank fluff for YouTube because I had no idea how to put it on! All sorted now and it's on ready to try out but before I break it on my first attempt at using it (believe me, it's possible), is there anything I shouldn't use it for?
Can I use zigzag and tricot stitch?
Should I take it off when sewing elastic on a leotard?
Is it literally only for sewing two or more layers together?
When you get to the end and realise your bobbin ran out at the beginning....

Iminei

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #24 on: April 23, 2018, 19:10:23 PM »
I have no idea about tricot stitch  (??) but as long as you have a zigzag plate on your machine you can sew zigzag with your WF.

I always use an open-toed walking foot but imagine that a normal WF can do zigzag (check it has a suitable slit opening before you do that) and its for sewing three or more layers together and fabrics that would otherwise tend to creep, such as Velvet.
The Imperfect Perfectionist sews again

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Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #25 on: April 23, 2018, 19:15:52 PM »
If you have the regular walking foot it should zigzag with out any trouble. The only possible problem is when you get one for a straight stitch machines, it will go on a zigzag machine but I don't think there is needle hole for zigzag on any of them. They are mostly made to fit the narrower feed dogs on vintage straight stitchers, so anything might be possible.

Try it out with any stitch patter you think might be practical. It should work with any fabric or layers of fabric that easily fits under the presser foot.

Lolli

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #26 on: April 23, 2018, 19:27:12 PM »
I've primarily bought it for sewing lycra as it seems to shift under the normal foot. It appears to have the space for zigzag stitch and so I think if it will sew that it will also do tricot. Well here goes!....

(it looks like it's going to eat me)  0_0
When you get to the end and realise your bobbin ran out at the beginning....

BrendaP

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #27 on: April 23, 2018, 19:41:21 PM »
Attach the walking foot then set your machine for the widest zig-zag and hand crank it (using the balance wheel on the side) for a couple of stitches.  If the needle clears the foot OK then you can use it with any stich your machine can make - except maybe the obvious, buttonholes.
Brenda.  My machines are: Caroline a Singer 201K-3 born 1940, Thirza a Featherweight 221K born 1949, Azilia a Singer 201K born 1957 and Vera, a Husqvarna 350 SewEasy about 20 years old. Also Bernina 1150 overlocker and Elna 444 Coverstitcher.
http://paternoster.orpheusweb.co.uk/

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Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #28 on: April 23, 2018, 19:54:58 PM »
I should of course have thought of it  :o  , back stitching might be a problem and the tricot stitch has a lot of it. Some types seem to easily guides the fabric along with out much action on the fabric, others have more of a grip. You just have to try and see how it behaves.

Bodgeitandscarper

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #29 on: April 23, 2018, 21:27:53 PM »
and its for sewing three or more layers together and fabrics that would otherwise tend to creep, such as Velvet.
Three layers?  I used mine for two and it made a big difference  :)