The Sewing Place

Walking Foot

Lolli

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #30 on: April 23, 2018, 21:47:25 PM »
Attach the walking foot then set your machine for the widest zig-zag and hand crank it (using the balance wheel on the side) for a couple of stitches.  If the needle clears the foot OK then you can use it with any stich your machine can make - except maybe the obvious, buttonholes.

@BrendaP if I had any sense I would have done that. As it happens I don't, so I just went for it instead. Fortunately for me (and my machine) it was fine. I tried a medium zigzag first, then tricot on width 5 and it was all good. I used lycra so I could see how much difference it makes with shifting and I'm pleased to say it worked great.

I just want to check, if I'm in the process of making a leotard would I take the WF off to sew the elastic in?

I should of course have thought of it  :o  , back stitching might be a problem and the tricot stitch has a lot of it. Some types seem to easily guides the fabric along with out much action on the fabric, others have more of a grip. You just have to try and see how it behaves.

@arrow so whilst using the WF I shouldn't backstitch to secure stitches?
I hope my Tricot stitch means the same to everyone else here. In my manual it's a 3 step zigzag?
« Last Edit: April 23, 2018, 21:52:52 PM by Lolli »
When you get to the end and realise your bobbin ran out at the beginning....

arrow

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #31 on: April 23, 2018, 22:01:45 PM »
Three step zigzag is fine, it's the stretchy stitch patterns, (single needle over lock patterns) and a few of the decorative that might be disrupted by the forward motion of the walking foot. The patterns were you see the fabric moves something like two step forwards and one step back you might get into trouble with a walking foot. You might get away with a short reverse for securing the stitches, or just a few stitches at zero stitch length.

Lolli

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #32 on: April 23, 2018, 22:23:40 PM »
That's great thank you. I only ever use straight, zigzag or 3-step zigzag on my machine, I've not needed to use any of the others (yet). I'll try a a couple of of reverse stitches on a scrap piece of fabric to check it's o.k.
When you get to the end and realise your bobbin ran out at the beginning....

Iminei

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #33 on: April 24, 2018, 12:11:45 PM »
Three layers?  I used mine for two and it made a big difference

@Bodgeitandscarper

Were they fabrics with nap? ie Velvet

Because when sewing, using a standard foot, you are (generally) sewing two layers of fabric together ...
the top fabric (as I understand) piggybacks on the bottom fabric which is moved by the feed dogs, which doesn't happen so well when you have a third layer in the way ...

hence the invention of lil feed dogs to move the top layer ie the walking foot
The Imperfect Perfectionist sews again

Bodgeitandscarper

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #34 on: April 24, 2018, 13:15:34 PM »
Three layers?  I used mine for two and it made a big difference

@Bodgeitandscarper

Were they fabrics with nap? ie Velvet

Because when sewing, using a standard foot, you are (generally) sewing two layers of fabric together ...
the top fabric (as I understand) piggybacks on the bottom fabric which is moved by the feed dogs, which doesn't happen so well when you have a third layer in the way ...

hence the invention of lil feed dogs to move the top layer ie the walking foot
I just used it on various woven fabrics - and it stopped that "creep" on long seams where you end up with one piece of fabric about an inch longer than the other - obviously I never pin or baste seams #bodgeit

Oh, and I never gave it a second thought when I backstitched at the end of a seam, worked perfectly well :-)
« Last Edit: April 24, 2018, 13:53:58 PM by Bodgeitandscarper »

arrow

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #35 on: April 24, 2018, 13:33:31 PM »
A walking foot can make a differene. For simpler seams you can align the layers before you start stitching, by placing the fabric under the foot, needle in place, they lift the fabric up, stretch it slightly. It works well on regular fabrics like cotton, and it's easy to do it as you go a long. For slippery fabrics I pin a lot, with or with out a walking foot, but I usually take out the needles before it goes under the walking foot. For regular fabrics seams shouldn't be that bad, for quilting I there's always lots of layers and no pinning, the walking foot turns out a must.

Lulu

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #36 on: April 30, 2018, 23:23:50 PM »
@Lolli
Thanks for this thread..I made sure I had a WF as someone mentioned it was good for stretchy fabrics, but I have been too afraid to use it! I feel a lot better informed now, thanks everyone!  :D

Lolli

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #37 on: April 30, 2018, 23:55:59 PM »
@Lolli
I have been too afraid to use it!

I was too! It looks like it would either eat me or the fabric lol. Once you've got it on it's just the same as sewing with a normal foot and it really does stop the fabric from creeping
When you get to the end and realise your bobbin ran out at the beginning....

BrendaP

Re: Walking Foot
« Reply #38 on: April 30, 2018, 23:57:56 PM »
If you are sewing something which requires a slightly longer length to be eased into a slightly shorter length as one seam, ie a sleeve cap which is lightly longer than the armscye it makes sense to not use a walking foot and to have the longer side next to the feed dogs as they will help feed the lower layer through slightly quicker.
Brenda.  My machines are: Caroline a Singer 201K-3 born 1940, Thirza a Featherweight 221K born 1949, Azilia a Singer 201K born 1957 and Vera, a Husqvarna 350 SewEasy about 20 years old. Also Bernina 1150 overlocker and Elna 444 Coverstitcher.
http://paternoster.orpheusweb.co.uk/