The Sewing Place

Interlining wool fabric

Francesca

Interlining wool fabric
« on: October 11, 2018, 10:42:00 AM »
I just bought some fairly loose weave wool for a coat. Being loose weave it doesn't have much structure despite being thick so I think I will need to interline it with something.

I have horsehair canvas but I don't want to interface the whole coat with it obviously. My plan was to stitch it to the collar pieces, and add a band of it around the cuffs and the hem of the jacket so when pressed they don't get a horrible bubble look.

But what to do for the rest of the coat? In the past I've had fairly decent luck with just plain old unwashed calico but was thinking there is probably something "proper".

Would normal sew-in work? I feel like it isn't the nicest quality.

Maybe I need to seek out a woven sew-in rather than the cheap non-woven stuff?

toileandtrouble

Re: Interlining wool fabric
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2018, 12:03:39 PM »
I've used plain calico to underline a loose woven suit fabric which worked very well.  It also made it warm, because it trapped a layer of air.

Starryfish

Re: Interlining wool fabric
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2018, 12:50:45 PM »
I use stuff called domette, it's a fluffy sort of cotton. Please don't use vilene it won't hang right and I don't know how it would be long term.

Lizzy777

Re: Interlining wool fabric
« Reply #3 on: October 11, 2018, 13:05:31 PM »
I use stuff called domette, it's a fluffy sort of cotton. Please don't use vilene it won't hang right and I don't know how it would be long term.

I would have thought Domette would be more used in interlining rather than underlinings?

"Interlining is an additional layer of fabric that goes between the lining and the fashion fabric to add warmth. This should not to be confused with underlining, which is an additional layer of fabric to add body to flimsy fashion fabrics."
https://www.burdastyle.com/blog/interlining-for-warmth


I would go for something lighter to underline a loosely woven fabric as you don't really want to add a lot more weight or warmth with an underlining. There's quite a few lighter fabrics that are suitable for your wool coat @Francesca
« Last Edit: October 11, 2018, 13:28:02 PM by Lizzy777 »

Missie

Re: Interlining wool fabric
« Reply #4 on: October 11, 2018, 13:09:47 PM »
If it is a loose weave, I would use a horse-hair canvas on the main body as well, but only on upper back/shoulders and upper front/shoulders continuing down the length of the front of the coat at the front edge, about 10-15cm in width (ie along the button stand/hole area), backed onto cotton lawn.   You will need to pad stitch the 2 layers together (just a reminder that the horse hair is cut without the seam allowance) and then invisibly catch those 2 layers to the main coat fabric.  If it is a looseweave fabric, you will need the canvas to support the weight of the fabric on the shoulder area plus it will give a more professional finish.

Francesca

Re: Interlining wool fabric
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2018, 13:19:52 PM »
@Missie that sounds excellent and I have Claire Schaffer's tailoring book which has loads of examples so that sounds perfect.

BUT. I still think I need more lining on the other parts. I can't imagine this fabric hanging with nothing but it and the lining fabric I have, I don't think it'll go together very well. So I would think:

1. Soft lining
2. Some sort of lightweight sew-in
3. Horsehair canvas in strategic places (shoulder, button band, cuffs, hem, collar)
4. Wool

Definitely in need of something for that lower part of the body and sleeves.

Plain calico might be the answer. Worked well in my Mum's mac coat.

Lizzy777

Re: Interlining wool fabric
« Reply #6 on: October 11, 2018, 13:27:05 PM »

@Francesca

This is a well written informative page to read with good suggestions for underlinings too.
https://www.britexfabrics.com/blog/2013/06/03/interfacing-interlining-underlining-and-lining/

Threads magazine has good information but I find that this link to a crafty page has a lot of the threads information on it.

Also, can look here as well.

Look at the section 'WHAT FABRIC SHOULD YOU USE FOR UNDERLINING?'.
https://www.craftsy.com/sewing/article/how-to-use-underlining/
Most of what is written there is straight from the threads magazine. Experiment with some samples and try the the sample underlinings with your fabric in your hand and see which feels right and doesn't show through the colour of your fabric.




Lizzy777

Re: Interlining wool fabric
« Reply #7 on: October 11, 2018, 13:29:40 PM »
Sorry I wrote my previous post before I read the other posts and just posted it now as I got interrupted.

The thing you need to look out for is not making the coat too heavy by using too heavy a fabric/canvas for the underlining. You would sew the underlining to the coat first before you start to interface. Then you can select the right interface for the area or areas that you feel need it. That would go on after the underlining?

Anyways, sounds like an interesting project.


lizzy
« Last Edit: October 11, 2018, 13:32:55 PM by Lizzy777 »

Ploshkin

Re: Interlining wool fabric
« Reply #8 on: October 11, 2018, 14:10:43 PM »
In Alison Smith's Craftsy class on structure and shaping she underlines a loose weave wool fabric with something quite lightweight, like muslin, so that it doesn't affect the drape of the fabric but gives it stability and it prevents any darker interfacing showing through. 
Life's too short for ironing.

Francesca

Re: Interlining wool fabric
« Reply #9 on: October 11, 2018, 14:25:24 PM »
I'm thinking a cotton poplin might work. Crispy but very light.

Missie

Re: Interlining wool fabric
« Reply #10 on: October 11, 2018, 15:11:33 PM »
@Missie that sounds excellent and I have Claire Schaffer's tailoring book which has loads of examples so that sounds perfect.

BUT. I still think I need more lining on the other parts. I can't imagine this fabric hanging with nothing but it and the lining fabric I have, I don't think it'll go together very well. So I would think:

@Francesca  Sorry, didn't make myself very clear (what do you mean you can't read my mind :-p ).  You would cut the lawn (or poplin) the same as the coat pieces so that the entire coat is underlined and then attach the horse hair canvas to that so that only the strategic parts are covered with the canvas and then the canvas/cotton layer is treated as one.  Absolutely go for sewn-in, do not touch the iron on in this situation.  And yes, use the canvas at cuffs and hem.

As regards which underlining is better, it would depend on the style of the coat.  My inclination is that unless it is a very straight, structured coat (which I don't think is something you wear, but I may be wrong :-D ), I think  the calico might be too stiff for the fabric.  You need to work with the drape of the loose weave.

And then obviously you would also use lining as well.
« Last Edit: October 11, 2018, 15:20:31 PM by Missie »

Francesca

Re: Interlining wool fabric
« Reply #11 on: October 11, 2018, 15:34:07 PM »
@Francesca  Sorry, didn't make myself very clear (what do you mean you can't read my mind :-p ).  You would cut the lawn (or poplin) the same as the coat pieces so that the entire coat is underlined and then attach the horse hair canvas to that so that only the strategic parts are covered with the canvas and then the canvas/cotton layer is treated as one.  Absolutely go for sewn-in, do not touch the iron on in this situation.  And yes, use the canvas at cuffs and hem.

As regards which underlining is better, it would depend on the style of the coat.  My inclination is that unless it is a very straight, structured coat (which I don't think is something you wear, but I may be wrong :-D ), I think  the calico might be too stiff for the fabric.  You need to work with the drape of the loose weave.

And then obviously you would also use lining as well.

It's actually quite a boxy coat, with no real waist shaping (unusual for me yes but I thought as it's quite short it'd still look nice). https://www.simplicity.com/simplicity-storefront-catalog/patterns/women/dresses/simplicity-pattern-8451-mimi-g-misses-dress-and-lined-coat/

So I think a lightweight poplin is probably the answer. I'll see if I can find some in stash and hold it all together to get an idea of the feel, but will probably buy black which I don't have.

Esme866

Re: Interlining wool fabric
« Reply #12 on: October 11, 2018, 17:25:30 PM »
I once bought my nicest coat ever for a last minute business trip to Chicago in late February. Living in the southern US I hadn't owned a proper coat in years. Stayed toasty warm for 2 days in Chicago - and probably wore it no more than 6 times over the next decade. Was it forever HOT!

Turns out it was made in Russia - exterior fabric very heavy wool melton - interlined with domette - all required canvases and a thermal acetate/rayon lining.

How warm does your coat need to be?

I have had in my stash for decades a very heavy, yet VERY loosely woven dark brown wool boucle. It will need a simple pattern (hoping the one in my SWAKOP works out!) But I have narrowed my interlining down to two possibilities. Either a black rayon challis (which I think I have in my stash) or a black lightweight cotton flannel. The final decision will rest on what is available for a lining as that will affect the warmth)

At present I am leaning towards the challis as pad-stitching it to the wool will not have an ill affect on the drape - a black cotton batiste is as crisp as I would dare go. A poplin would turn my fabric into cardboard. Something to think about.  Then of course, utilize all proper canvases and don't forget a good pair of shoulder pads to maintain shape.

Someone on this site listed a link for a pdf of Poulin's book on tailoring.  I recently downloaded it myself. I have several of Claire's books and the Cabrera book on women's tailoring - and the Poulin is by far the most inclusive. Highly recommend the download to anyone interested in tailoring.  Just wish I could remember the link.

Francesca

Re: Interlining wool fabric
« Reply #13 on: October 11, 2018, 17:55:31 PM »
How warm does your coat need to be?

Not warm at all, to be honest! I am very rarely outside for long periods and if I am I'm walking around the city and generating heat. Domette will be far too hot for me. It's a frustration actually, I love winter coats and winter fashion but when you're on and off trains and tubes all day you're always sweating or freezing.

The lining I've picked is just poly, but it's "pongee". Sort of twill-like. It's obviously not breathable but it's got a slightly cool touch.

I think I'll go for poplin + canvas.

BrendaP

Re: Interlining wool fabric
« Reply #14 on: October 11, 2018, 18:14:13 PM »
It sounds as though you need underlining to add structure rather than interlining to add warmth.

From "Threads Sewing Guide":
Underlining and interlining are both interior layers of fabric placed beneath the fashion fabric.  The terms are sometimes used interchangeably, but the functions of interlining and underlining are different.
Underlining is placed behind the fashion fabric to improve the look, feel and functionality of the the fabric.  It provides body, opacity and support for longer wear and a more professional appearance.  Construction details can be attached to the underlining without evidence of them showing on the garment outside.  Typical underlining fabrics include cotton batiste, cotton flanelette, wool flannel or felt, rayon challis or, for nearly weightless support, silk organza.
Interlining is a layer of fabric added to the garment lining for warmth and insulation.  Cotton flannel is a favourite for interlining, but you can use wool or synthetic batting that's made specifically for this purpose; these add more warmth with less weight.
Brenda.  My machines are: Caroline a Singer 201K-3 born 1940, Thirza a Featherweight 221K born 1949, Azilia a Singer 201K born 1957 and Vera, a Husqvarna 350 SewEasy about 20 years old. Also Bernina 1150 overlocker and Elna 444 Coverstitcher.
http://paternoster.orpheusweb.co.uk/