The Sewing Place

Blind hemmer

Bodgeitandscarper

Blind hemmer
« on: November 17, 2018, 12:04:30 PM »
Just had an email about this - linky - Do I need one?  I'm thinking the answer is no, as I tend to mainly sew jersey/stretch fabrics, so use my cover stitch for hems... but it does seem cheap... no, I really don't have room for it either!
Out of interest, does any one have one or has anyone used one?  Waddya think of them?

toileandtrouble

Re: Blind hemmer
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2018, 12:12:43 PM »
I got it too and wonder I ought to upgrade my second hand Babylock with the straight needles.  It doesn't cope well with the very fine modern suitings.  Wonder if this would be really invisible.  Factories manage it

So Chic

Re: Blind hemmer
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2018, 14:13:20 PM »
I think you would have to do a lot of hems to justify the cost of this machine.  Also most sewing machines and some overlockers can do a blind stitich.
So Chic
Bernina Artista 630, Bernina 800DL, Janome Cover Pro 1000CP + elderly Singer Touch & Sew 720G hiding in loft

toileandtrouble

Re: Blind hemmer
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2018, 14:29:00 PM »
Mine are alterations.  The youngsters always have new suits for weddings and they are all very fine materials.  I end up doing them by hand to give a proper finish, which  takes a good half hour on that thin stuff.  If I save half an hour on each pair, how long before i have justified it?  I wish I was within reach of GUR to see one in action.

BrendaP

Re: Blind hemmer
« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2018, 23:05:10 PM »
There are a couple of YouTube videos showing how blind hemmers work.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F11qSCNUDxQ
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3XbXZXtcDus

The blind hemming stitch on a regular machine is different, and needs a bit more fabric preparation and requires a bit more operator skill as there's no guide to run the hem along, but with a fine thread  it can be nearly invisible, depending on the fabric.

Brenda.  My machines are: Caroline a Singer 201K-3 born 1940, Thirza a Featherweight 221K born 1949, Azilia a Singer 201K born 1957 and Vera, a Husqvarna 350 SewEasy about 20 years old. Also Bernina 1150 overlocker and Elna 444 Coverstitcher.
http://paternoster.orpheusweb.co.uk/

toileandtrouble

Re: Blind hemmer
« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2018, 23:54:26 PM »
Depending on the fabric is the rub.  I can get an almost invisible hem on medium weights with the straight needle hemmer, just wondering if the curved needle machine could catch  a smaller 'bite' and show much less on the finest worsteds.
'

toileandtrouble

Re: Blind hemmer
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2018, 14:48:41 PM »
I gave in.  Hope it is worth it.

BrendaP

Re: Blind hemmer
« Reply #7 on: November 22, 2018, 19:22:51 PM »
You must report back and tell us how you get on with it 0_0 :sew:
Brenda.  My machines are: Caroline a Singer 201K-3 born 1940, Thirza a Featherweight 221K born 1949, Azilia a Singer 201K born 1957 and Vera, a Husqvarna 350 SewEasy about 20 years old. Also Bernina 1150 overlocker and Elna 444 Coverstitcher.
http://paternoster.orpheusweb.co.uk/

toileandtrouble

Re: Blind hemmer
« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2018, 22:09:45 PM »
Aye aye captain.

toileandtrouble

Re: Blind hemmer
« Reply #9 on: November 23, 2018, 18:44:05 PM »
First off, I think this one is from China. Casting is a bit rough. Manual probably copied from somewhere else and done by someone with poor English, lots of typos.  Diagrams not too clear and one seems to be missing. Good thing I know how my old one works. The threading is OK but the needle eye is only just visible on the highest point.  I had to use tweezers and get a strong light on it. I  think someone with poor eyesight would struggle. Probably explains why factories use that horrible 'invisible' thread for everything.  I still want to match my work though.
The tension holds the mono-filament well and it does a neat stitch although not quite as invisible as my hand stitching.  About a million times faster though.  It gallops off at 1200 st/min which makes it hard to control. They do supply a clamp to stop it coming  off the table!  I've only just unpacked it though and need to play with the settings yet.  Haven't worked out what size needle is in it. It had better not break because I can't shift the needle clamp screw, might have to call in reinforcements when it does.  Ditto on the wing nut that holds the work surface. 
This one has no light, being industrial type. Locks off the thread well, better than the old one.
Overall, I get the impression it is a bit more 'focused' than my straight needle Babylock, which is old and second hand. The build on that is very good as you'd expect.
When I get  a decent set of samples will come back and add them. Just talk among yourselves, this could take quite a while. (i.e. not today!)

Bodgeitandscarper

Re: Blind hemmer
« Reply #10 on: November 23, 2018, 18:56:34 PM »
Thanks for the review, it's interesting to know what you think of it. 
BTW, how about a pair of pliers for undoing the screws that are tight?

toileandtrouble

Re: Blind hemmer
« Reply #11 on: November 23, 2018, 19:44:42 PM »
Just found another little packet, it's a rectangle of perspex (?) a clamping plate and two screws. No mention in the manual but there are two holes in a bracket which would hold it in front of the working area, so I'm guessing safety device?  Nothing in the pictures but it makes some sense.  There is also a small plastic dust cover.
@Bodgeitandscarper  pliers OK for the wing nut although I don't like the look of the metal,  but the needle clamp has a screw (driver supplied)
Just fitted the plastic screen and the pre-drilled holes don't quite mate up with  the bracket but got it to hold. (Their screwdriver doesn't fit the little screws, but I have one that size) It does, however lift up out of the way for needle threading.
Didn't mention the knee lifter, you can use both hands to position the work and then lock it in place with the knee lifter.
« Last Edit: November 23, 2018, 20:00:27 PM by toileandtrouble »

Esme866

Re: Blind hemmer
« Reply #12 on: November 24, 2018, 20:17:06 PM »
The only thing that would justify this purchase for me would be if I'd just bought a huge new house and needed to make drapes for all the windows - but the my machine could handle that.

I've yet to see a home sewn "blind hem" that was as invisible as my handstitching.

But...if I were sewing drapes for others for extra cash...I'd be all over that purchase!

Renegade Sewist

Re: Blind hemmer
« Reply #13 on: November 24, 2018, 22:18:04 PM »
I hope it turns out to be a good investment for you. I was a bit surprised when I joined her by how many of you do sewing for hire in one fashion or another. You see less of that, much less, on most of the US based forums. In real life I know several hundred people who sew. Can only think of a handful, maybe a bit over a dozen, who sew for profit. One does bridal (badly- I've talked to some of her clients) another does for a dry cleaner, one has an ETSY shop and the others teach garment or quilting classes at the local shops.

But you lot! Dance costumes for an entire troupe (!!!!), a hem here, bridal and bridesmaid dress alteration, a jacket over there and more. Wow...you are industrious.
The clever cat eats cheese and breathes down rat holes with baited breath. w.c. fields

toileandtrouble

Re: Blind hemmer
« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2018, 15:24:07 PM »
 After a while the foot pedal loosened up  and it will go a bit slower for me.  I did samples on various fabrics and it does take a slightly smaller bite of material. The stitch is very neat (if you can see on the brown check)  There is a slight puckering on the right side of the lighter materials and the knit.  With adjustments to the tension, that might be reduced or overcome, but I'm not going to touch  it until I have marked the dial with a line of enamel paint, so I can return it to the optimum position. I do wish they would put numbers on all tension units.  Overall, I think it is a worthwhile improvement
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