The Sewing Place

Medieval Dress and mens outfit

Missie

Re: Medieval Dress and mens outfit
« Reply #15 on: March 19, 2019, 13:42:50 PM »
@datcat23   I'd forgotten about Reconstructing History; they have a men's pattern which might be good as a starting point and are downloadable.  Haven't made anything of theirs so can't vouch for them, but I have them marked as a source of interest!
A measly 2.5m of stash used so far!

datcat23

Re: Medieval Dress and mens outfit
« Reply #16 on: March 19, 2019, 20:52:45 PM »
So I have made a start.  Here is my inspiration shot,  (I actually find this guy quite attractive so bodes well for hubby)



And I have purchased a base pattern to use.  I will be using the long, split tunic part from this pattern.



Obviously I need to make a few alterations.  The pattern has a (hold your breath) ZIP!!!   :|  That will go.  I will put in a neck keyhole, and a laced opening at the back.  I will decide closer to the date, if I will be applying a decorative trim, or embroidering the hemline.  We shall see. 
The barefoot seamstress:  smelling vaguely of lavender and mothballs, and desperately craving chocolate.

wrenkins

Re: Medieval Dress and mens outfit
« Reply #17 on: March 20, 2019, 07:31:27 AM »
I searched 'gilly shirt' and all sorts of self drafted patterns came up for gillies and for olde worlde tunics. I would tend to lace the front rather than the back for a man.
I know nothing about the history but I'm a wow at fancy dress!  0_0 I suspect the desired effect is less historically based and more 'Robin Hood Prince of Thieves'.  0_0
Fashion fades, style is forever!

datcat23

Re: Medieval Dress and mens outfit
« Reply #18 on: April 23, 2019, 05:37:47 AM »
I have taken the first step, and produced a muslin for hubby's tunic.  Muslin fabric was a white sheet, purchased at the local charity shop.  Edits resulting .... I will need to add a bit more width to the waist/hips area, and extend the facings a bit.

Hubby doesn't want the big applique panel across the shoulders, so that has eased some of the pressure.   I still think it needs some sort of embroidery at the neckline.  Whether I purchase some celtic knot files to embroidery directly onto the tunic, or embroider onto a contrast fabric, and then do an external facing .... not exactly sure.  I plan to embellish the hemline/split, but I plan to use a purchased trim for that.  I have to remind myself, that I don't need to rush ahead with this.  I have 4 months until the wedding. 

tunic muslin by Dani, on Flickr
The barefoot seamstress:  smelling vaguely of lavender and mothballs, and desperately craving chocolate.

DementedFairy

Re: Medieval Dress and mens outfit
« Reply #19 on: April 23, 2019, 08:15:15 AM »
@datcat23   I'd forgotten about Reconstructing History; they have a men's pattern which might be good as a starting point and are downloadable.  Haven't made anything of theirs so can't vouch for them, but I have them marked as a source of interest!
NO NO NO NO NO don't go near RH they are CRAP patterns.  Honestly, there's lots of info out there about the disastrous state of their patterns.  The 'designer' is a costume historian, but doesn't sew herself, and it appears she doesn't get anything pattern tested either.  Drafting up of sizes is atrocious, instructions and pattern markings blatantly incorrect or full of glaring omissions.  She is notorious for slagging off anyone who criticises her publicly, so I make it my mission to do so loud and clear!
DO NOT BUY
C'est moi!

Morgan

Re: Medieval Dress and mens outfit
« Reply #20 on: April 23, 2019, 10:30:12 AM »
Fun project Datty, will enjoy seeing your progress.


datcat23

Re: Medieval Dress and mens outfit
« Reply #21 on: April 30, 2019, 08:59:24 AM »
WDYT? 

I have picked up a big piece of cotton muslin, and after washing its the texture of a really soft cheesecloth.  I am considering that my chemise, to go under my dress, will work well in this fabric, but I am not sure. 

What do you think?  Will it stand up to being an undergarment?
The barefoot seamstress:  smelling vaguely of lavender and mothballs, and desperately craving chocolate.

Greybird

Re: Medieval Dress and mens outfit
« Reply #22 on: April 30, 2019, 09:17:41 AM »
Don't see why not? If it's stood up to washing it should stand up to wearing.

datcat23

Re: Medieval Dress and mens outfit
« Reply #23 on: April 30, 2019, 09:44:05 AM »
It has stood up to both washing and tumble drying, so while its semi-see through, it seems like its ok. 
The barefoot seamstress:  smelling vaguely of lavender and mothballs, and desperately craving chocolate.

HenriettaMaria

Re: Medieval Dress and mens outfit
« Reply #24 on: April 30, 2019, 15:39:33 PM »
Look up the re-enactment fraternities on Google, most specifically Regia Anglorum.  There are loads of images you can get inspiration from for decoration.  Fabrics really should be wool or linen, of course, although if you want to go up-market, silk and fur are also period-correct.

If you're within travelling distance of Coventry and the wedding is next year, you can try The Original Re-enactors' Market for accessories, fabric, shoes, etc:

https://www.reenactorsmarket.co.uk/index.html

Unfortunately, you've missed March's event and the next one isn't until November, but you could contact Anne and she could put you on to some appropriate vendors.



datcat23

Re: Medieval Dress and mens outfit
« Reply #25 on: May 01, 2019, 08:13:24 AM »
[quote author=HenriettaMaria link=topic=6755.msg115779#msg115779 date=1556635173

If you're within travelling distance of Coventry and the wedding is next year, you can try The Original Re-enactors' Market for accessories, fabric, shoes, etc:

https://www.reenactorsmarket.co.uk/index.html
[/quote]

You are sweet @HenriettaMaria , but its unlikely I access this resource.  Australia is a fair distance away from Coventry.  I have to add the consideration, that while it will still be winter, it will actually be quite warm.  So regardless of tradition, I need to consider the heat when choosing fabrics.  So I might pass on the fur.  LOL ;)
The barefoot seamstress:  smelling vaguely of lavender and mothballs, and desperately craving chocolate.

datcat23

Re: Medieval Dress and mens outfit
« Reply #26 on: May 05, 2019, 04:53:29 AM »
So today I decided to make a start on my under-dress muslin, and also trial the embroideries, that will be going on the dresses.

My first hurdle?  Dealing with instructions that are obviously written by a non-sewer.  Sewing terminology and processes are so ingrained into my brain, that the sight of "the side panels are two trapezoids with a gore in the middle", is enough to make me twitch.  Some measurements are missing, and others you are told to guess.  As you can imagine, it is stressing out my tiny little obsessive brain.

I have made my first seamstress change to the process.  I have drafted to pattern paper, rather than straight onto the fabric.  While I appreciate the "no waste" method for cutting, I just need pattern pieces. 

I think I need another coffee, before I tackle anything else. 
The barefoot seamstress:  smelling vaguely of lavender and mothballs, and desperately craving chocolate.

wrenkins

Re: Medieval Dress and mens outfit
« Reply #27 on: May 05, 2019, 06:56:20 AM »
I can't believe the number of posts, similar to this, that I read on here about patterns.  :[
When I have to do an SOP (standard operating procedure) for a new piece of kit, the first thing I do when it is finished is hand the SOP to a complete randomer, with no previous experience, and see if they can operate the equipment. I don't stand the randomer in front of the equipment and expect them to write the SOP.  :o
Why don't these people get their efforts proof read by someone with experience before they unleash them on the unwary. Iminei et al are having the same problems with their murder mystery quilt instructions. Imagine if a dressmaking numpty (me!) tried to follow the pattern. I'd be going in my vest!
Fashion fades, style is forever!

datcat23

Re: Medieval Dress and mens outfit
« Reply #28 on: May 05, 2019, 12:38:40 PM »
Its infuriating ...... the instructions (such as they are) tell you that a gore goes between two side pieces.  What it doesn't tell you, is that you have to sew the shoulder seams, attach the short ends of the side pieces to the underarm seam of the sleeve, and stitch the whole thing to the side of the front and back in one long seam, BEFORE sewing the gore into what is basically the side seam, continuing on to the underarm.  If you don't, you basically have to firnarcle (my own word) two Y-seams ..... and boy aren't they fun!  And it needs gussets under the arms but doesn't have them in the instructions or measurements. 

My husband does not understand why this is stressing me.  He may .... or may not .... live to wear his costume.   :devil:
The barefoot seamstress:  smelling vaguely of lavender and mothballs, and desperately craving chocolate.

DementedFairy

Re: Medieval Dress and mens outfit
« Reply #29 on: May 05, 2019, 12:58:04 PM »
Yep.  She doesn't sew herself, so if you ask questions you get baffling [and eventually angry] answers back.  She clearly doesn't pattern test, so many of her patterns are a disaster, with missing or incorrect instructions.  Often she has simply reproduced period patterns, drafted up to 'modern' sizes but with no knowledge of pattern grading applied.  Pattern pieces are mislabelled,  [eg a gigot sleeve with the underarm seam labelled as the sleeve head, and a cuff measurement that wouldn't fit round a pencil etc etc]
Be loud and vocal about your issues.  Eventually I managed a refund for ONE Of the crappy patterns I'd bought.
Post all of this on Pattern review to maybe save someone else all this pain- there is no way this loony will withdraw or correct any of her crap products
C'est moi!