The Sewing Place

Poll

Vote for the winner of the New To Me Technique contest - everyone has 2 votes

#1 BrendaP’s 1st entry
13 (11.7%)
#2 BrendaP’s 2nd entry
24 (21.6%)
#3 Wrenkin’s entry
6 (5.4%)
#4 Lilian’s 1st entry
12 (10.8%)
#5 Lilian’s 2nd entry
9 (8.1%)
#6 Sleepingwolf’s entry
13 (11.7%)
#7 Indigotiger’s entry
34 (30.6%)

Total Members Voted: 55

Voting closed: September 14, 2019, 14:11:42 PM

New to me Technique - voting thread

Manuela

New to me Technique - voting thread
« on: August 26, 2019, 09:35:42 AM »
#1 BrendaP’s 1st entry


What was the ‘new to’ me technique?
Machine stitched 'trapunto' style quilting and use of transfer dyes

Pattern used
A piccie from the web, my own watercolour and a tracing
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A short description on how you made it/problems overcome/etc.
Painted the transfer dyes onto thin paper and had a play, then cut the tracing into sections to use as a template to cut pieces of painted  paper which were positioned over the base fabric and ironed (between baking parchment) to transfer the dye.   I think the fabric is poly cotton which is why the colour is fairly subtle, but a loose enough weave for the stuffing to show through.
Then base fabric mounted over a (yellow) backing fabric and the shapes machine stitched around.
The backing fabric was slit behind each segment, chopped up knitting yarn stuffed in and the slits hand sewn closed.
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Bits of hand embroidery and bling added then the whole lot was stretched over mount board and put into a frame.
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Frame apperture 10"x12"




#2 BrendaP’s 2nd entry

What was the ‘new to’ me technique?
First time making a pictorial wall hanging

Pattern used
Lots of images from the web and my own collage to get the feel of it
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A short description on how you made it/problems overcome/etc.
Art group had beach huts as a theme, and my effort was a collage rather than a painting.  I used that collage as a sort of template for the fabric version.

It started as an old pale pink pillow case.  Blue and turquoise "Brusho" dye was painted on for the sky, but the turquoise washed out.  Then a layer of shiny pale blue organza to give it light.  The sea is a couple of different blue fabrics topped with a blue organza and the sand a cream fabric, again topped with very fine organza.  I've read that using the organza adds strength.

The huts were assembled as individual units and machine appliqued to the base.  Then the quilt sandwich assembled and machine quilting done around the huts and FMQ over the sand and water.  Then bits of bling added, the whole thing squared up and regular binding done.
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Finished size 21"x13"




#3 Wrenkins’ entry

This was intended as my mug rug for the swap but the swap starts 01-09 and I finished this yesterday! Oops.

I surfed and found a picture I liked that I thought would be suitable for an Autumnal theme. Artistic talent have I none.

I drew a sketch (see above) and cobbled together a leaf template and a tree.
New techniques were the applique, making binding, applying binding and actually finishing something. It's meant to have a little wren on a branch but that was just one step too far for me. By the time I'd done the applique I was fit for nothing. It was really hard!  :o

The construction was a carry on too because I didn't want my leafy applique stitches to come through. They'd be far too visible on the back.  ><

The binding was a nightmare and was too fiddly by far. Lesson learned. Don't try to bind a mug rug!

I enjoyed doing it in a scary way but it was more a lesson in 'things not to do when you're making your swap mug rug'. In other words...Wrenkins, know your limits!  0_0

I hope you like it.
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#4 Lilian's 1st entry

(Angus)
What was the 'new to' me technique
It is all new to me. Sewing up small limbs and sewing the head pieces correctly. Fitting joints for body parts, stuffing the parts smoothly without lumps. Embroidering the nose and mouth.

Pattern used (commercial or self-drafted, anything goes)

I got the pattern from the web, enlarged it slightly. Followed brief instructions.
He is 7 inches tall standing up.

A short description on how you made it/problems overcome/etc.
I used fabric from stash and stuffing was pure wool (an attempt to recycle 'Woolcool' packaging) I also put some lavender from the garden in with the stuffing to give a pleasant smell when squeezed and also to ward off any insects that might be attracted to the wool.  The pattern used buttons inside the limbs so that the arms and legs could move.  This was too fiddly for my hands so I put the buttons on the outside.  The buttons I used for his eyes were white as that was all I had so, I used a brown Sharpie to colour them in – it looks more red!

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Oops! the photos have come out a bit big!

Forgot to finish the text.

I named him Angus after the plaid fabric I used.  Also I think he's had one too many tots of whisky hahaha!

This is the very first bear I have made. I have only ever stuffed a pincushion before now, so this was quite a challenge for me.




#5 Lilian’s 2nd entry

(Suzie? A friend's daughter thinks it's definitely a girl. I'm not convinced -<)

What was the 'new to' me technique
Fitting joints for body parts, stuffing the parts smoothly without lumps. The sewing of the head front gusset.  Embroidering the nose and mouth, inserting joints correctly. Phew!

Pattern used (commercial or self-drafted, anything goes)
I found a different pattern on the web for a slightly larger bear.  An 11 inch tall bear.

  [ You are not allowed to view attachments ]  pattern pieces

  [ You are not allowed to view attachments ]  inserting button for swivel head

 

A short description on how you made it/problems overcome/etc.
I used fabric from stash and stuffing was pure wool (an attempt to recycle 'Woolcool' packing) I also put some lavender from the garden in with the stuffing to give a pleasant smell when squeezed and also to ward off any insects that might be attracted to the wool.

This pattern used safety joints on the arms and legs, I purchased these especially for this bear.  I put them on quite tightly so s/he wouldn't have floppy limbs.  This was a bit fiddly for my hands but I managed it.  I decided I wanted her to have a swivel head too, so using two large buttons, I put one in the head and one in the body and with strong thread managed to pull through each button, stitching the body and head closed then pulling threads tightly and knotting.  S/he can now turn her head.

  [ You are not allowed to view attachments ]  sitting on my featherweight


This is my second attempt at making a bear (Angus being my first) having learned from some mistakes. I have only ever stuffed a pincushion before now.




#6 Sleepingwolf’s  Entry

This fleece hoodie is a birthday present for my mother who enjoys wearing slightly unsuitable clothing to embarrass my rather more conventional father.  Those of you who had been following the coverstitch thread might not be surprised to find that the new to me technique is to used my new machine to finish a garment rather than keep playing with scraps.  I also used a PDF pattern for the first time!

       
The pattern was included in a Craftsy class (Sewing With Knits: 5 Wardrobe Essentials) I bought years ago and didn’t take much notice of because I didn’t much care for the techniques she used to sew up the patterns.  I was looking for a fairly simple pattern with no darts or fastenings.  The only alterations I made were to shorten the sleeves and straighten out the waist shaping a little.

The fabric was originally two children’s throws from Asda.  If I hadn’t been so keen to match the “stripes” I could have used just one.  The fabric is fleecy on both sides, shed horribly when cut and squirmed like nothing on earth when I tried to sew it together.  I reluctantly had to hand baste all the seams and hems just to keep the pieces from shifting ( I hate hand sewing).  After that the overlocker and coverstitcher handled it fine.  The hems on the sleeves and body were fine but I had a harder time with the curved facing on the hood and after ripping out a couple of time I cut a new hood and started again.  Happily the next attempt was perfect and I could finally attach the hood.



In the pictures the hems look like there is some tunnelling but that is just the thickness of the fleece pile (honest ;)).  Despite all the frustrations it came out much better than I expected and I smile every time I imagine my mother wearing it.




#7 Indigotiger’s entry

indigotiger's 16th century linen apron

What was the ‘new to’ me technique:
honeycomb smocking

Pattern used: I mostly followed the directions for the "Honeycomb Pleatwork Apron", but followed the smocking tutorial from Katafalk.

A short description on how you made it/problems overcome/etc.

I am currently making an entire set of everyday 16th century German clothing for my friend Maeva (who like me, does historical re-enactment), and decided to make this apron as a gift for her... While I have done assorted hand stitchery since I was a child umpteen years ago, I have never done smocking of any type before.
The apron is made from lightweight linen and entirely hand-stitched. I started with the honeycomb smocking, following the directions from Katafalk, and was surprised at how easy it was to do! The only problem was that I had lost my water-erasable marker and so had to substitute some children's Crayola washable marker... which worked but really took quite a bit of washing to remove. I ended up soaking the smocking for overnight in a sink full of cold water and castile soap, with a little dishes soap for good measure.
I was relived to see in the morning that the green dots were gone!  Once that was done, and the apron dry again, I began on hemming all the edges. Linen folds nicely, and I was able to make wee tiny whip stitches. The various directions I found online said to trim off a strip from the bottom edge of the apron to use for the narrow waistband and ties, but once I did that, I decided that made the apron a bit too short for Maeva, who is taller than I.
So, I decided to cut a separate hemline band, and hem one edge with the same width as all the rest, but the other edge deeper, which would add weight to the lower edge and help the apron hang well, and then whipstitch the hemline band to the lower edge of the apron. Needless to say, all that additional hemming added quite a bit of extra time to the project, but in the end, I am really pleased with how it turned out, and my friend Maeva is delighted.
The narrow hemmed edges are 3/8" wide, and the bottom hem is 2 1/2" deep. The whole project took me about three weeks of "spare time" sewing; I like to have a handwork project to tote along while I ride on public transit, since without a car, I ride the bus and the train rather often, and having a project helps keep me from feeling like I am wasting my life, but rather using the time productively
















« Last Edit: September 07, 2019, 14:05:29 PM by Manuela »

Manuela

Re: New to me Technique - voting thread
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2019, 14:13:55 PM »
Voting has started  :)

Iminei

Re: New to me Technique - voting thread
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2019, 14:36:57 PM »
Sooo difficult to choose ...
There were 3 outright winners for me ... Sorry to **************************** who didnt get the vote
but Im sure others will choose yours!
« Last Edit: September 07, 2019, 16:39:51 PM by Iminei »
The Imperfect Perfectionist sews again

Greybird

Re: New to me Technique - voting thread
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2019, 15:24:48 PM »
I have voted, but I'll swear it gets harder and harder to choose with these competitions. I had to choose quickly or I would have sat here all night in agonies of indecision, changing my mind.

Puzzler

Re: New to me Technique - voting thread
« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2019, 16:41:28 PM »
Well done, ALL of you. I really enjoyed reading your blurbs and it appears that despite some frustrations, you all enjoyed making these items. It shows in the finished products. Oh dear, how to choose....

Kenora

Re: New to me Technique - voting thread
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2019, 17:53:47 PM »
I've just voted but - I agree - it was really, really hard deciding which beautiful piece(s) of work to vote for. :S The standard just keeps going up. :)
Minding my P's & Q's in Portreath

Lachica

Re: New to me Technique - voting thread
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2019, 23:35:29 PM »
What? Only 2 votes?! Sorry to my 3rd choice. They're all really good , so I had to go with the ones I'd have found difficult, but wish I'd had a go at.
Mary
2020 stash: not gonna count, not gonna feel guilty.

Lilian

Re: New to me Technique - voting thread
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2019, 20:53:37 PM »
I have voted, but it was a difficult one!  :)
Willing but not always able :)

hernibs

Re: New to me Technique - voting thread
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2019, 17:08:34 PM »
Goodness, such wonderful work to be first time of trying....hard, hard, hard.....