The Sewing Place

Pauline Alice Quart Coat

Ploshkin

Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
« Reply #15 on: February 14, 2020, 11:01:39 AM »
You could use a heavy weight sew in interfacing instead of canvas but because canvas is woven it has some 'give' and will mould itself to the appropriate shape with stitching and pressing.  A non woven interfacing won't do this.
Life's too short for ironing.

UttaRetch

Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
« Reply #16 on: February 14, 2020, 14:29:34 PM »
With it being a loose weave, how would it hold the pleats?
This was my thought too, so you are not on the wrong track.
What goes around comes around.

b15erk

Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
« Reply #17 on: February 20, 2020, 09:08:49 AM »
It has begun!  And has already raised some issues I hadn't expected.   :S

I mostly cut out the pattern yesterday afternoon, and found that the collar pattern piece has lost itself.  :S  The beauty of a pdf pattern is that I can go and print off another one, although it is a pain.  The lining is a nightmare, slipping and sliding everywhere, so I need to finish cutting that out today.

The fabric is far more loosely woven and light weight than I had thought, so I made the decision to fuse lightweight interfacing to all of the pieces.  I'm sure this is the right thing to do, as it's fraying as soon as it's lifted off the cutting table.

So, that was the job last night. Tedious, but the fabric does feel more stable.  I also found a piece of fabric suitable to use as canvas - until I find a reasonably priced supplier.  Just a bit more research to do regarding pad stitching, and whether to make a front guard, or just the back as the pattern says.

I've decided at this point to use this as a toile which may, or may not, be wearable.

Any tips or useful advice will be much appreciated!  ;)

Jessie

Jessie, who is very happy to be here!!  :),  but who has far too many sewing machines to be healthy, and a fabric stash which is becoming embarrassing.

Ploshkin

Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
« Reply #18 on: February 20, 2020, 10:55:23 AM »
Jessie, I think it is good to do some interfacing in the top of the front as well as a back stay.  There's a lot of weight with a coat and it gives a stable top bit for all the weight to hang from.  It also helps to fill in the natural hollow that we have just below the shoulder and above the bust.
Life's too short for ironing.

dolcevita

Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
« Reply #19 on: February 20, 2020, 11:45:21 AM »
It's worth spending a bit more time on the inner construction, especially if you have a softer fabric. As Ploshkin says, it gives the rest of the coat support and something to hang off.

Here's an excellent post by Sigrid on her blog, detailing her approach.  Her jackets and sewing are superb.

Sigrid's sewing blog

b15erk

Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
« Reply #20 on: February 20, 2020, 12:11:31 PM »
@dolcevita , Sigrid's blog is exactly what I needed - thank you!!

I'm hoping to finish the cutting out later on, then I can carry on fusing interfacing...

I'm resigned to this being a slow sew, as I haven't made a 'proper' jacket before.

I have no great hopes for this, I'm doing it mainly as a learning exercise - although it would be nice if it was wearable.

Jessie
Jessie, who is very happy to be here!!  :),  but who has far too many sewing machines to be healthy, and a fabric stash which is becoming embarrassing.

UttaRetch

Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
« Reply #21 on: February 20, 2020, 12:11:51 PM »
@b15erk, I hope you have chosen the correct weight for block fusing.  My tapestry coat could have stood up by itself when it was newly finised.
What goes around comes around.

b15erk

Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
« Reply #22 on: February 20, 2020, 12:17:12 PM »
@UttaRetch , I have used a very fine fusible, the very cheap non-woven sort.  It actually does feel better for having some stability.

I bought a really nice narrow stabiliser which is perfect for the fronts, this is rather heavier, and I hope will help keep the shape at the front. I think it's an industrial stabiliser, it's not something I've seen before, but I'll be buying more - before my local fabric shop runs out!

Jessie

Jessie, who is very happy to be here!!  :),  but who has far too many sewing machines to be healthy, and a fabric stash which is becoming embarrassing.

dolcevita

Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
« Reply #23 on: February 20, 2020, 12:21:20 PM »
It's worth looking online for fusibles.  The more modern types, not vilene, are very good and excellent for adding body and firmness without going crispy or stiff.  English Couture has an excellent range, although a little pricey.

Regarding the shoulder stay, you don't have to use canvas, you're just after something that will help take the strain off the fashion fabric. I've successfully used cotton twill before now - it's firm but pliable and gives a nice structure.

Ploshkin

Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
« Reply #24 on: February 20, 2020, 13:51:20 PM »
That book, recommended on Sigrid's blog post, is the one that I have.  It is a very useful book, mine is currently on loan to a neighbour who is tackling a jacket for her son.
Life's too short for ironing.

Ohsewsimple

Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
« Reply #25 on: February 20, 2020, 14:20:15 PM »
I’m another fan of that book.  Simple to understand and photos make it better than diagrams I always think.

UttaRetch

Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
« Reply #26 on: February 20, 2020, 18:04:21 PM »
I have two books on tailoring from different publishers, which are identical.  One of the publishers is Singer and from it's 'reference library series.'
What goes around comes around.

b15erk

Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
« Reply #27 on: February 21, 2020, 09:28:56 AM »
Depending on how this coat turns out, I may well invest in one of those Tailoring books.  I did go to tailoring classes many years ago, but I was too impatient at the time... For now, You ladies, Sigrid's blog, and the Readers Digest book are filling the gaps in my knowledge.

I did some work on the coat last night, and immediately started to question the instructions... >< 

The pleats are constructed first, and I did the first panel, before thinking - what about the hem?  I think it will be far more difficult to press the hem in after the pleats have been 'set'.  What's the thinking on this?  I don't mean stitching the hem, just pressing it up.

The fabric is behaving OK up to now, after interfacing all the pieces, and the pleats seem to be holding well, but, I have overlocked all the way around the pleat pieces to stop them fraying.  I intend to overlock all the other pieces as well, as it makes the fabric easier to work with, and should stop the fabric stretching out.  I'm also more convinced than ever, that using giant press studs is the way to go - I really wouldn't want to attempt bound buttonholes on this one!

These preliminary jobs are tedious, but essential, I do see that, but I'll be glad to get on to some real sewing!

Jessie

« Last Edit: February 21, 2020, 09:30:34 AM by b15erk »
Jessie, who is very happy to be here!!  :),  but who has far too many sewing machines to be healthy, and a fabric stash which is becoming embarrassing.

dolcevita

Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
« Reply #28 on: February 21, 2020, 11:50:59 AM »
I'd definitely do the hem before setting in the pleats.  Trying to press it up after they are done is sure to take out some of the pleats themselves.

A thought on the pleat panels and keeping them where they need to be.  I would interline the fashion fabric with something such as a cotton poplin or lawn. Don't sew the two layers together to start, as you will get a turn of the cloth effect as the pleats are put in.  Mark the pleat lines with a long running stitch on the outside of the fashion fabric first.  Lay the lawn on top and tack in along the length of the first pleat line only.  Press the line. Repeat for the next pleats. If you were to open out the two pieces of fabric after doing this, you would find that the lawn will be a different size to the fashion fabric, and this is why you need to keep them loose whilst setting the pleats in.  Once it's all in, put a prickstitch down the length of each pleat to hold the fashion fabric and interlining together, then remove the long tacking stitches.

You could also, depending on how particular you want to be, put a strip of lightweight good quality fusible down the length of each pleat - this will hold the crease better then and would be quicker than interlining. This would be quicker than interlining, but less weighty.

Spend plenty of time on the pleats - they are a main feature of the coat and need to be as good as you can get them.

b15erk

Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
« Reply #29 on: February 21, 2020, 12:07:35 PM »
@dolcevita So glad you agree about the hems, I may end up re-cutting one of the panels as I have pleated it without the hem.

I have made a note of your tips about pleats, they always cause me a problem.  This time, I used a fine interfacing on the whole panel, which didn't add to the bulk of the fabric, but helped to hold the pleat and control the very loose weave.  For once the pleats went in perfectly, and I've used hairclips top and bottom to hold them in place (hairclips are my new big thing  ;)).

I'm at work just now, but planning to swoop in to town later to top up on interfacing as I've used it all stabilising this fraying mass!  I'm going to look for some stuff I've seen mentioned for interfacing hems, but my local fabric shop only has specialist stuff by mistake!  ;)

If I have an hour left, I'll be looking at the shoulder shield, and how to construct it.  I'm sure it will involve copying part of the upper front pattern.

Please keep the advice coming, there isn't a great deal of tailoring on t'internet - at least not at my level!

Jessie

Jessie, who is very happy to be here!!  :),  but who has far too many sewing machines to be healthy, and a fabric stash which is becoming embarrassing.