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The Emporia => In the wardrobe => Patterns Discussion => Topic started by: b15erk on February 11, 2020, 14:36:17 PM

Title: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 11, 2020, 14:36:17 PM
The coat has begun.  Baby steps atm.  I've spent the morning sticking the pattern pieces together, and roughly cutting them out to see if I can get this coat out of the fabric available.

I've attached pics of two possible layouts, and I think, that by the time I've cut the correct size out, and laid the fabric out properly, I may have enough fabric.

At this point, it's looking like I'll only get one collar on the fold, but I'm sure the under collar can be pieced.  I've even managed to get it all on-grain!

Also, at some point this week, I need to go in to town to buy interfacings etc.

Fingers very firmly crossed on this one!

Jessie
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Ellabella on February 11, 2020, 14:51:23 PM
Well done Jessie, pattern companies have to be generous with their estimates but 50% seems a bit much.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: dolcevita on February 11, 2020, 14:53:02 PM
If you want to have the collar as a full stand up collar, it might be worth thinking about piecing the top collar rather than the undercollar - you will see the undercollar CB seam, not so much the top collar.  Get some canvas for interfacing it, too, to get a good stiffness into it that will hold the shape without too much bulk.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: dolcevita on February 11, 2020, 14:55:54 PM
Looking at a few images of the coat (gorgeous!), it would be worth cutting the canvas on the bias.  You could then put a bit of pad stitching into the front top corner to get the roll down and keep it where you want it, assuming you want it to curl downwards, of course.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 11, 2020, 15:03:06 PM
Girls, thank you so much!  I'll need all the help I can get with this.  ;) @dolcevita , I've put canvas on the shopping list, and I'll make a note about the collar when I get to that point.

Fortunately, Google has provided a lot of information on this coat.  There is a blog post from SunnyGalStudio, which shows her progress in good detail. :)

Then, I found gold.  Pauline Alice have their own tutorial, that you can print off!  It looks quite detailed too. :)

All this for £8?  Seems pretty good value to me.

Jessie
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 12, 2020, 13:47:02 PM
Gutted!

Just been going through the Pauline Alice tutorial, and realised that when I was checking to see if I had enough fabric, I had missed a crucial piece.

So, not only have I only 1 complete collar, I have no front facing.

Time for a fabric re-think...  :'(

Jessie
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: dolcevita on February 12, 2020, 15:00:48 PM
Do you have a contrast fabric that you would happy to use?  You could do the inside/upper collar and facings in a contrast.  Perhaps a pale grey? Alternatively, with a bit more work, you could reduce the size of the pleated section and either have fewer pleats or less deep ones.  Cut the pockets from lining material with the outer edge from the main fabric (you generally only see the first couple of inches of the inside of a pocket) as well, and this would give you enough room to squeeze out the facing from the layout on the second photo, moving the pocket bag out of the way.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 12, 2020, 15:09:06 PM
@dolcevita , thank you so much for the encouragement!  I will go back and have another look at the layout.

It also crossed my mind that I could do it as a shorter jacket, without the pleats.  It's an option.

I do like those pleats though... ;)

Jessie
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Tamnymore on February 12, 2020, 16:49:34 PM
@b15erk you've done a great job getting all those pattern pieces onto your fabric. Looking good!  I sometimes make the undercollar in my lining fabric and I've also made front facings in lining fabric when I haven't got enough main fabric. This is also a good way of eliminating bulk if your fabric is quite thick.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Ohsewsimple on February 12, 2020, 17:10:59 PM
Some great suggestions for squeezing this pattern out of what you have.  I have seen a vintage coat somewhere that was lined to the edge, eliminating the need for facings altogether as @Tamnymore suggested.  I remembered it because I thought it looked beautiful.  If you do manage to out facings in, they can be cut in two sections with a diagonal seam to join.  Just don’t forget to add seam allowances!   :)
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Nevis5 on February 13, 2020, 07:41:32 AM
That was my first thought, too @Ohsewsimple  !  I have definitely done this on jacket facings when I hadn't got enough fabric for a full length facing.   Good luck, @b15erk !  I'm itching to see the results as this is such a lovely jacket pattern.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 14, 2020, 10:27:34 AM
Well, look what I've turned up!  Inside the treadle cupboard of all places.

There is about 4yards (or more) of this lovely fabric.  It's a very loose weave, but heavy, so will need stabilising, but I've no idea of the composition - it doesn't feel like wool though.  The lining fabric is a heavy, drapey satin, and feels very lush.

So, what do you think of the idea of using this fabric instead of the lovely blue?  I know that I will have enough of this, so won't need to faff about.  It will also give me a chance to see how the pattern makes up, and whether I can use the blue for a modified model.

I also managed to get interfacing yesterday, a yard of cotton iron on, which is beautiful, but I got the last yard, some bog standard fusible, and a couple of yards of very narrow interfacing which looks perfect for facings.  So, far I haven't got any canvas - is there anything else I can use?  The only one I found was white iron on which I don't think I want. I also ordered some tie interfacing for sleeve heads, but I think I'll make my own shoulder pads.

What are your thoughts?  I really want to make a start over the weekend.

Jessie
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: wrenkins on February 14, 2020, 10:40:20 AM
With it being a loose weave, how would it hold the pleats? I know nothing about these things.  :[
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 14, 2020, 10:43:55 AM
@wrenkins , well, I've sort of glossed over that bit, but vague thoughts about using a fine interfacing?  I have got plenty of fabric to practice with...

thrust someone to find the fatal flaw...  ;)

Jessie
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: wrenkins on February 14, 2020, 10:49:19 AM
I see for problems because I'm afraid of fabric that has a mind of it's own.  0_0 My school uniform had a pleated skirt and we stapled them!  0_0 Made a feature if you will...  :S
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Ploshkin on February 14, 2020, 11:01:39 AM
You could use a heavy weight sew in interfacing instead of canvas but because canvas is woven it has some 'give' and will mould itself to the appropriate shape with stitching and pressing.  A non woven interfacing won't do this.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: UttaRetch on February 14, 2020, 14:29:34 PM
With it being a loose weave, how would it hold the pleats?
This was my thought too, so you are not on the wrong track.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 20, 2020, 09:08:49 AM
It has begun!  And has already raised some issues I hadn't expected.   :S

I mostly cut out the pattern yesterday afternoon, and found that the collar pattern piece has lost itself.  :S  The beauty of a pdf pattern is that I can go and print off another one, although it is a pain.  The lining is a nightmare, slipping and sliding everywhere, so I need to finish cutting that out today.

The fabric is far more loosely woven and light weight than I had thought, so I made the decision to fuse lightweight interfacing to all of the pieces.  I'm sure this is the right thing to do, as it's fraying as soon as it's lifted off the cutting table.

So, that was the job last night. Tedious, but the fabric does feel more stable.  I also found a piece of fabric suitable to use as canvas - until I find a reasonably priced supplier.  Just a bit more research to do regarding pad stitching, and whether to make a front guard, or just the back as the pattern says.

I've decided at this point to use this as a toile which may, or may not, be wearable.

Any tips or useful advice will be much appreciated!  ;)

Jessie

Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Ploshkin on February 20, 2020, 10:55:23 AM
Jessie, I think it is good to do some interfacing in the top of the front as well as a back stay.  There's a lot of weight with a coat and it gives a stable top bit for all the weight to hang from.  It also helps to fill in the natural hollow that we have just below the shoulder and above the bust.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: dolcevita on February 20, 2020, 11:45:21 AM
It's worth spending a bit more time on the inner construction, especially if you have a softer fabric. As Ploshkin says, it gives the rest of the coat support and something to hang off.

Here's an excellent post by Sigrid on her blog, detailing her approach.  Her jackets and sewing are superb.

Sigrid's sewing blog (https://sigridsewingprojects.blogspot.com/search/label/jacket%20construction%20inside)
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 20, 2020, 12:11:31 PM
@dolcevita , Sigrid's blog is exactly what I needed - thank you!!

I'm hoping to finish the cutting out later on, then I can carry on fusing interfacing...

I'm resigned to this being a slow sew, as I haven't made a 'proper' jacket before.

I have no great hopes for this, I'm doing it mainly as a learning exercise - although it would be nice if it was wearable.

Jessie
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: UttaRetch on February 20, 2020, 12:11:51 PM
@b15erk, I hope you have chosen the correct weight for block fusing.  My tapestry coat could have stood up by itself when it was newly finised. (https://i.imgur.com/S39XZCT.png)
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 20, 2020, 12:17:12 PM
@UttaRetch , I have used a very fine fusible, the very cheap non-woven sort.  It actually does feel better for having some stability.

I bought a really nice narrow stabiliser which is perfect for the fronts, this is rather heavier, and I hope will help keep the shape at the front. I think it's an industrial stabiliser, it's not something I've seen before, but I'll be buying more - before my local fabric shop runs out!

Jessie

Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: dolcevita on February 20, 2020, 12:21:20 PM
It's worth looking online for fusibles.  The more modern types, not vilene, are very good and excellent for adding body and firmness without going crispy or stiff.  English Couture has an excellent range, although a little pricey.

Regarding the shoulder stay, you don't have to use canvas, you're just after something that will help take the strain off the fashion fabric. I've successfully used cotton twill before now - it's firm but pliable and gives a nice structure.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Ploshkin on February 20, 2020, 13:51:20 PM
That book, recommended on Sigrid's blog post, is the one that I have.  It is a very useful book, mine is currently on loan to a neighbour who is tackling a jacket for her son.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Ohsewsimple on February 20, 2020, 14:20:15 PM
I’m another fan of that book.  Simple to understand and photos make it better than diagrams I always think.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: UttaRetch on February 20, 2020, 18:04:21 PM
I have two books on tailoring from different publishers, which are identical.  One of the publishers is Singer and from it's 'reference library series.'
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 21, 2020, 09:28:56 AM
Depending on how this coat turns out, I may well invest in one of those Tailoring books.  I did go to tailoring classes many years ago, but I was too impatient at the time... For now, You ladies, Sigrid's blog, and the Readers Digest book are filling the gaps in my knowledge.

I did some work on the coat last night, and immediately started to question the instructions... >< 

The pleats are constructed first, and I did the first panel, before thinking - what about the hem?  I think it will be far more difficult to press the hem in after the pleats have been 'set'.  What's the thinking on this?  I don't mean stitching the hem, just pressing it up.

The fabric is behaving OK up to now, after interfacing all the pieces, and the pleats seem to be holding well, but, I have overlocked all the way around the pleat pieces to stop them fraying.  I intend to overlock all the other pieces as well, as it makes the fabric easier to work with, and should stop the fabric stretching out.  I'm also more convinced than ever, that using giant press studs is the way to go - I really wouldn't want to attempt bound buttonholes on this one!

These preliminary jobs are tedious, but essential, I do see that, but I'll be glad to get on to some real sewing!

Jessie

Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: dolcevita on February 21, 2020, 11:50:59 AM
I'd definitely do the hem before setting in the pleats.  Trying to press it up after they are done is sure to take out some of the pleats themselves.

A thought on the pleat panels and keeping them where they need to be.  I would interline the fashion fabric with something such as a cotton poplin or lawn. Don't sew the two layers together to start, as you will get a turn of the cloth effect as the pleats are put in.  Mark the pleat lines with a long running stitch on the outside of the fashion fabric first.  Lay the lawn on top and tack in along the length of the first pleat line only.  Press the line. Repeat for the next pleats. If you were to open out the two pieces of fabric after doing this, you would find that the lawn will be a different size to the fashion fabric, and this is why you need to keep them loose whilst setting the pleats in.  Once it's all in, put a prickstitch down the length of each pleat to hold the fashion fabric and interlining together, then remove the long tacking stitches.

You could also, depending on how particular you want to be, put a strip of lightweight good quality fusible down the length of each pleat - this will hold the crease better then and would be quicker than interlining. This would be quicker than interlining, but less weighty.

Spend plenty of time on the pleats - they are a main feature of the coat and need to be as good as you can get them.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 21, 2020, 12:07:35 PM
@dolcevita So glad you agree about the hems, I may end up re-cutting one of the panels as I have pleated it without the hem.

I have made a note of your tips about pleats, they always cause me a problem.  This time, I used a fine interfacing on the whole panel, which didn't add to the bulk of the fabric, but helped to hold the pleat and control the very loose weave.  For once the pleats went in perfectly, and I've used hairclips top and bottom to hold them in place (hairclips are my new big thing  ;)).

I'm at work just now, but planning to swoop in to town later to top up on interfacing as I've used it all stabilising this fraying mass!  I'm going to look for some stuff I've seen mentioned for interfacing hems, but my local fabric shop only has specialist stuff by mistake!  ;)

If I have an hour left, I'll be looking at the shoulder shield, and how to construct it.  I'm sure it will involve copying part of the upper front pattern.

Please keep the advice coming, there isn't a great deal of tailoring on t'internet - at least not at my level!

Jessie

Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: dolcevita on February 21, 2020, 12:15:15 PM
It sounds like you're doing all the right things, Jessie, so keep at it.  There's always a lot of work in a garment like this, especially when you're learning lots of new stuff, but that's the fun of it.  And the great sense of achievement when you've finished it and got a lovely coat to wear.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 24, 2020, 10:06:08 AM
Well, the weekend went, as usual, far quicker than the weekdays ever do!  I feel as if I put a lot of effort into this, but so far with little to show.

For the most part, I've been caught up with the back and shoulder area - pad stitching takes so long!!  I see now why it would be useful to thread several needles before starting.  Shoulder pads are also made and shaped - I like them better than what I have previously bought.

The fabric is of the very devil, and I'm so glad that I used a fine iron on interfacing to help with the stability.  I'm also overlocking the edges.

One worry atm, is shrinkage.  I thought this fabric was some sort of man-made stuff, so I happily used the steam freely.  But, the pleat pieces seem to have shrunk, and if they've shrunk, so will the other pieces.  Not much I can do about it now... I'm going to cut a square of fabric, trace it, and them steam it well, that should give me some idea of the shrinkage - if any.  It may just be my poor cutting out...

Jessie
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Ohsewsimple on February 24, 2020, 12:34:53 PM
@b15erk is it the fabric or have you used any canvas or interfacing that might shrink?   Always a good idea to pre shrink that as well.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 24, 2020, 13:08:33 PM
@Ohsewsimple , I think it's the fabric, because on the pleated pieces, I haven't used any canvas, just fine non-woven interfacing.

I was going to try to get into town later, for more interfacing, after the rain stopped me on Friday, but it's just as wet and even colder today...  :(

Plenty more prep I can do... :S

Jessie



Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: dolcevita on February 24, 2020, 16:11:00 PM
Before you commit yourself to the full garment, do your shrinkage test.  You can then decide whether to proceed as a wearable garment, that may not be wearable for too long due to the fragility of the fabric, or to use it as your sample garment for all the techniques that you can use when you make your next version.  It's really useful to have a sample garment along with a few notes for each technique that you can refer to in future projects. You also don't have to beat yourself up if something doesn't go quite to plan and you have to make one compromise too many.  I have a couple of sample jackets that I made from when I did a speed tailoring course and a traditional tailoring course and still refer to them now.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 26, 2020, 09:06:59 AM
I managed to do some work on this last night, and I'll be ready to start construction soon - at least by weekend. I've been a bit delayed as I needed more interfacing, which meant a trip into town - and one I've put off since Friday.

I pressed all the lining pieces, stabilised the hems and overlocked all the pieces.  It's a very fluid satin fabric, and frays nearly as badly as the main fabric.  :S

I'll do my shrink test today - spare fabric is here, in work, so it will be done later.

Jessie



Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: dolcevita on February 26, 2020, 12:03:45 PM
Fingers crossed for the shrink test.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 26, 2020, 14:57:59 PM
 :'( :'( :'(

I don't believe it!  Look at the shrinkage on that! :S

That's on a four inch (10cms) square of fabric, and the fabric was cut to fit the square.

Good job I was resigned to doing this as a test garment.  I'll have to try to press without steam in future, just to get it finished.  :'( :'( :'(

I've never had this happen before... :'( :'( :'(
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: StitchinTime on February 26, 2020, 15:12:20 PM
I'll have to try to press without steam in future, just to get it finished.

Oh no, that's not good. You'll also have to remember not to sit next to a radiator in it if it gets wet  :(
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: dolcevita on February 26, 2020, 15:34:19 PM
Wow! Time to focus on techniques and choosing something gorgeous for the real thing. Strike whilst the iron is hot  :ninja: and the methods are fresh in your mind.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Missie on February 26, 2020, 15:39:10 PM
@b15erk  I made a coat for a college course and my tutor advised that for all coat fabrics to give them a good steaming before cutting out in case they shrank. You have just reminded me of this.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Elnnina on February 26, 2020, 18:03:41 PM
Jessie I was also taught to pre-shrink any woollen fabric first using a wet cloth and at that time a hot iron (not a steam iron as they were not around then) and it works, but it does take a lot of time handling the yardage used for a coat on a domestic ironing board - also the wool gives off a strange smell.  Nowadays I would use a piece of sheeting and a hot iron and have a bowl of water alongside in order to keep on putting the piece of sheeting in - it is surprising just how quickly it dries out.  Then once the length of fabric has been treated, leave it to get totally dry before trying to cut it out.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: UttaRetch on February 26, 2020, 18:45:38 PM
I still have hopes of making a new winter coat and I am now thinking of boiled wool.  Would I still have to preshrink that?
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: dolcevita on February 26, 2020, 18:56:53 PM
I still have hopes of making a new winter coat and I am now thinking of boiled wool.  Would I still have to preshrink that?
For the boiled wool jacket I made recently, I chucked the fabric into the washing machine and did a cool wool wash before drying and then cutting the pieces.  It didn't come to any noticeable harm.  If you use a strong colour, though, it's worth checking how colour fast it is before washing the whole thing. 
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: UttaRetch on February 26, 2020, 18:59:44 PM
Nope, I don't prewash.  The most I might consider is drycleaning, BUT nothing I have ever made has subsequently shrunk in the wash.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Ohsewsimple on February 26, 2020, 20:39:33 PM
If it’s wool it will shrink as you work with it when pressing.  That’s the beauty of it and why it makes wonderful fabric for jackets and coats.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 27, 2020, 09:05:53 AM
I'm really not understanding why this fabric has shrunk so much - it's definitely not wool, the strands are very springy, and feel man-made.

I've decided to carry on with the coat, taking in to account the shrinkage, if I get a wear out of it, that's fine, if not, I have gained some skills.

I did more pad stitching last night - it's tedious, and you really do need to get into a rhythm with it.


Jessie
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Ploshkin on February 27, 2020, 09:14:44 AM
Padstitching a collar or lapels is satisfying because you can feel and see the shape developing until they'll behave all by themselves
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: UttaRetch on February 27, 2020, 10:59:37 AM
All that work @b15erk for something that you may not work for you  :(  I am sure it will be excellently done, so perhaps just donating it is the way to go.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on February 28, 2020, 09:50:32 AM
@UttaRetch , I'm not too bothered about whether I can wear it or not (although it would be nice), it's more about becoming familiar with a new way of working, and new techniques and when to use them.

Tbh, since the shrinkage incident, I feel a bit more relaxed about the whole thing.  I've worked out that overall, I could possibly lose about 2.5 - 3 inches overall, and as I had made the largest nearest to mine, taking ease into account, may well mean I can get a wear out of it.  It's not that important though, and I've had a really important lesson.

Yesterday, I found some useful YouTube videos HERE (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DsSy3ktTB7w&t=18s)
Laurie Kurutz, is a mainly theatrical tailor I believe, and although I'm not sure how that differs from a normal tailor, I found her videos excellent.

Over the weekend I'm hoping to make some headway with actual sewing, as the prep work is, for the most part done (I think).

Jessie
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Elnnina on February 28, 2020, 15:20:42 PM
Jessie please do not get disheartened by what is happening with your coat and the shrinkage.  Just put this down to the learning process - that is why when I first learnt about tailoring we spent the first term just making a sample - I still have mine and often refer to this permanent work sample and it shows all the different types of stitching that we learnt along the way and it is really useful.  Now some people complained that this was not what they signed up for, they had expected to just jump in straight away and not spend the time learning all the new techniques and what we packed into that first term was in fact what in the industry would have been a year or so of an apprenticeship.

Remember I mentioned a book to you when you first started this coat, Samuel Heath's Coat and Skirt Making - I only found this book on the library for sale trolley for £1 some 40 years after I had done that tailoring course, and this is the only book I have seen that featured the type of techniques that I learnt - I love pad stitching it is really satisfying, and also trying to shrink wool to do what you want it to do, i.e. to take a dart out of the wool without actually stitching or cutting the wool - something quite satisfying really.

Whatever you do in the end with this coat do keep it as your permanent workbook of what you have done and how you have done this.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on March 04, 2020, 09:07:19 AM
I am continuing with the coat @Elnnina , it would be wrong to say I won't be disappointed if it doesn't fit, but it is most certainly a learning curve for me.  I think treating it as a workbook is a great idea!

I managed to finish the two fronts last night - princess seams and pockets are looking good!  I've also been pad stitching the under collar, which I think is the right thing to do, as the fabric is a very floppy, loose weave.  I have brought it in to work today and if I finish the VAT Return and month end, I should have a few hours to finish that off - it's very time consuming.  :S

I did order the book which Sigrid recommended, but still waiting for it to arrive.  Atm, I'm relying on YouTube videos and common sense!  I found some great videos HERE (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DsSy3ktTB7w&t=18s).

Jessie

Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on March 05, 2020, 11:02:25 AM
This is getting a bit tedious as there is nothing yet worth photographing.

I finished the pad stitching on the under collar, and used a sturdy iron on for the top collar.  I'm glad I did, as I looked at some of the finished jackets yesterday online, and some looked a bit limp.  So far, the majority of my time has been spent stabilising the pattern pieces.  I haven't always used the correct materials, but ones which I considered 'near enough'.  This is my first 'proper' jacket, and I'm only just becoming familiar with the most commonly used stabilisers.  In this regard, I think the pattern fails a bit, as it seems there is minimal use of stabilisers.  @dolcevita , has been really helpful with this, and I now have a card with scraps of interfacing, canvasses and their descriptions, so that I will know what to use next time.

After finishing the collar, I pinned the back to the fronts, and also pinned the sleeve pieces together, mainly so that I can get rid of some the single pieces. It's such a pain rooting through a pile of pieces to find the right one.

Onwards and upwards.

Jessie

Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: dolcevita on March 05, 2020, 11:17:11 AM
If you've only ever worked with vilene and other interfacings aren't readily available, it's not surprising that you wouldn't be aware of the newer ones.  Modern interfacings have been around since the 80s, but only available industrially and not to the home sewer; they were/are used extensively in the 'soft tailoring' look of Armani.  Even now, I would say that you have to know about them and then actively seek them out.

For what it's worth, I usually leave the pattern pieces pinned to their fabric pieces until I'm ready to sew for speedy identification.  It also reduces the risk of cutting out a duplicate piece from what you think is spare fabric and turns out to be something like the back or some obscurely shaped other piece.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Missie on March 05, 2020, 11:18:57 AM
For what it's worth, I usually leave the pattern pieces pinned to their fabric pieces until I'm ready to sew for speedy identification. 

Snap! :D
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Elnnina on March 05, 2020, 11:20:00 AM
You are getting there Jessie, you are also learning a lot - tailoring is a real steep learning curve - and just think what you have managed to achieve so far. 

Just be careful with the iron on interfacings unless they are really attached they can bubble - just keep your eyes open and look at ready made coats and jackets that people are wearing and see if you can spot the bubbling - it is an eye opener.

Just be patient, it will all come together eventually and you will be pleased and it will be worth every minute you have spent and then you will have a permanent reference to all the techniques  you have used ready for future garments.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Ohsewsimple on March 05, 2020, 11:24:48 AM
Leaving the pattern attached till needed also keeps the piece stabilised and there is less risk of stretching and distorting. 
I’m sure you’ll be pleased when you’ve finished Jessie.  Making a jacket isn’t a quick sew whether traditional or speed tailoring. 
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on March 05, 2020, 11:30:11 AM
Oh ladies thank you for your responses!  There are so many pieces, and so little space in the sewing room, that I thought it might help to reduce the number of loose pieces.  I didn't pin the pieces to the pattern because I was afraid of the loose fabric weave catching, and pulling threads in the middle of the piece.  :|

I stand corrected, I'll go back and do it 'proper', later.  ;)

Jessie
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Ohsewsimple on March 05, 2020, 11:32:35 AM
I think you fused some light interfacing to the fabric didn’t you?   Did you do individual pieces or block fuse?   If you block fused it should have been ok. 
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: UttaRetch on March 05, 2020, 11:44:03 AM
I think the pattern fails a bit, as it seems there is minimal use of stabilisers.

You can make a wearable jacket or coat just by following the instructions.  Tailoring, even of the speed variety, is an altogether different order of magnitude.

You are determined to press on and it will have least have been a learning exercise.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Ohsewsimple on March 05, 2020, 12:09:11 PM
I often had people complain about patterns and the lack of info regarding interfacing. They thought the pattern should tell them exactly what to use.  I had to point out that the pattern companies have no idea what fabric you will be using or indeed the effect you want.  Two people could use a blouse pattern, one using crisp cotton and the other a soft viscose.  You wouldn’t use a stiff or heavyweight interfacing on the viscose but it would be ideal on the crisp cotton.  Of course, there is always the possibility that you want a stiff collar on the soft viscose and therefore the heavier weight interfacing would be ideal.   :)
Patterns are a starting point and it is up to us to decide what to use to achieve the desired effect.  And that means sampling, sampling and sampling. 
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Elnnina on March 05, 2020, 12:49:08 PM
Jessie why don't you take a trip to a shoe shop and ask if they have any boot boxes - I have an Ecco boot box size 59x36.5x11.5cms that I spotted on the shoe box discard heap and asked if I could have it - specifically for putting work in progress in, it keeps it all in place until I need a certain piece and there is no risk of it getting lost, crumpled or anything else, and it sits alongside my cabinet.  You might find that they also have some smaller but deep boxes with an attached lid (Padders) and that is also a useful size.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on March 05, 2020, 13:03:00 PM
@Elnnina , that's a great idea about the boot boxes, I use plastic shoe boxes for projects usually, but this project is just too bulky.  It's gone on the list!

I've also just received my Tailoring book, so I won't be relying on Google for help quite as much!

Jessie
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: dolcevita on March 05, 2020, 13:07:03 PM
You can make a wearable jacket or coat just by following the instructions.  Tailoring, even of the speed variety, is an altogether different order of magnitude.

You are determined to press on and it will have least have been a learning exercise.

Wearable, yes.  Worth wearing? Questionable. 

The use of interfacings isn't, or shouldn't be, a tailoring thing.  A quick search for versions of the coat show many examples, most of which would benefit from interfacings regardless of whether tailoring techniques were used.  There are drag lines from the neck going down the front, saggy hems, lumpy hems, floppy looking fabric bagging out and so on.  I daresay that the ladies who made their coats are rightfully proud of the effort they put in to produce their garments, but a few additional lines in the instructions to encourage the use of modern fusibles in addition to the basic materials could have made these coats look terrific.  As they stand, many of them are wearable - they keep the person warm, the closures work and they look more or less like the design.  If you saw the same standard of finish on a RTW garment, however, it would be rejected in short order and deemed not worth wearing. I support Jessie's comment that the instructions are lacking, but also think that any coat pattern should include information on using modern interfacings as vilene is a complete cop out these days.

Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: UttaRetch on March 05, 2020, 13:16:20 PM
I have made two coats which are both wearable and have been admired.  I am perfectly aware that there is a difference between sewing and tailoring, but from the point of view of the pattern companies a wearable garment is the aim.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: dolcevita on March 05, 2020, 13:23:28 PM
I disagree.  If a wearable garment were the aim of the pattern companies, they would not give instructions to press seams, understitch, trim and clip seam allowances, etc., or use interfacing at all where heavier fabrics are recommended, since none of these are necessary to produce a wearable garment.  As it is, they do make all these recommendations and, often, make a specific recommendation for vilene or similar interfacing.  This is not a question of tailoring, just laziness of the pattern companies/designers in not updating their advice to reflect the changing materials available.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on March 05, 2020, 13:36:32 PM
I think what I want to achieve is a 'proper' wearable jacket.  I say I haven't made coats and jackets before, although I suppose I have in a way, but all of them have lacked the well finished look of a good quality coat. 

I have seen your coats @UttaRetch , and they are beautiful, and benefit from not only your patience and attention to detail, but to the quality of fabric which you have used.

I have now received my Tailoring book, and that will be my reading matter for the duration of this project!  ;) :)

Jessie

Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: UttaRetch on March 05, 2020, 14:09:15 PM
I am going to defer to your expertise on the sewing front @dolcevita since I don't the energy to go back and forth on the subject of what is or is not a wearable garment.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: toileandtrouble on March 05, 2020, 16:25:06 PM
I found a jacket in the 'reduced' section, with one sleeve lining twisted right round, so you couldn't get your arm through. Does that count as a wearable garment?
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on March 05, 2020, 16:28:43 PM
I found one of those a few years ago @toileandtrouble - the salesperson couldn't see the problem as it looked OK until you tried to put it on!

There's more to this coat making business than meets the eye!

Jessie
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: UttaRetch on March 05, 2020, 16:29:44 PM
I found a jacket in the 'reduced' section, with one sleeve lining twisted right round, so you couldn't get your arm through. Does that count as a wearable garment?
No more than a trouser leg that was sewn shut at the hem.  What is your point?
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: toileandtrouble on March 05, 2020, 22:05:08 PM
@UttaRetch My point is that being commercially produced does not guarantee wearability.  I think my Quality Control is a bit better than that.  And my buttons don't fall off.
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on March 06, 2020, 09:20:39 AM
There has been progress!  :)

Well, as much as there can be when I only get an hour or two after work to sew.  I attached the front and back as I wanted to check the fit, and as far as I can see, it's OK.  This cheered me up, as I expected it to be far too small.  I think I may have to either alter, or make a bigger pair of shoulder pads, as they don't seem to be making a lot of impact.  We'll see.

The pic I've attached is the front facing and first lining piece.  I'm delighted with how this looks, but the lining is a slippery as a snake, and is going to have to be beaten into submission.  The spray starch has been used liberally!  ;)

I did have a go at doing the lining pleats, but I was too tired to wrestle with them for long, so I'll resume the battle tonight.  Pleats are not my favourite thing, and slippy, slidey satin pleats are the very work of the devil!  :devil:

Jessie
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: UttaRetch on March 06, 2020, 09:33:57 AM
It's looking good @b15erk.  Keeping everything crossed for you.  :D
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on March 06, 2020, 09:44:23 AM
@UttaRetch , thank you!  It's given me a bit of a boost, knowing that the fit isn't too far off - I'll just have to cut out the lunch time biccie! 

I've decided to leave out the epaulettes I think, and I've already decided I don't want the zips on the sleeves. 

My new tailoring book is already showing up my lack of tailoring technique  ;), good job I've decided to treat this as a learning exercise!

Jessie

Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: UttaRetch on March 06, 2020, 09:55:02 AM
I'll be referring to my copy of the Singer tailoring book  (https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61jovkwtToL._SX370_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)when the time comes for my next coat.  Incidentally, I unwittingly have two of these since it was published by another company with a different cover.  :facepalm:
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on March 06, 2020, 10:00:18 AM
I wonder if it's the same book @UttaRetch ?  I got mine from Amazon, from a recommendation by Sigrid.  It's published by McCalls, but no particular author.

  [ You are not allowed to view attachments ]  

Lovely clear pictures, and saves me having to stop work to locate a technique via Google!

Jessie
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Bodgeitandscarper on March 06, 2020, 10:41:51 AM
I've made coats that I think are great and perfectly wearable, and I'd never even heard of things like pad stitching til I read it here and I still don't really know what it is, but do know it'll be far too much faff for me  0_0
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: Ohsewsimple on March 06, 2020, 13:19:14 PM
Yes that’s the same book.  It went out of print for a while and was fetching huge prices.  Nice clear photos and very useful.  I’m know  there are other, far more complicated books out there but for the average person I think this one is really good.   
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on March 09, 2020, 09:28:29 AM
No sewing on Saturday as we had to return the doggies to DD, but it left Sunday free, and I managed a good few hours in the sewing room, where I felt that a lot of progress was made.

Coat and lining construction is now just waiting for the sleeves to be put in, and the collar added.

Sleeves, I'm a bit concerned about as they seem very long, and very wide.  So, before I go any further, I'll have to check them against another coat I wear regularly.  I'm also unsure of the lining.  When I've made previous lined projects, I've always cut the sleeve lining shorter, but this is the same length.  I think it may be because the sleeves have zips on, which I'm not doing, so I may need to adjust.  I'll be checking the width as well.

The collar seems straightforward, so maybe this week will see the coat finished. 

I do need to look for buttons though, I thought I had some, but they look too purple.

Jessie
Title: Re: Pauline Alice Quart Coat
Post by: b15erk on March 11, 2020, 10:53:16 AM
Still no further on with this, I've been a bit tired and stressed.

However, work hasn't entirely stopped, I ordered buttons, which I hope will look as nice when I receive them, as they did in the photograph!  I've also just taken delivery of 5 plastic boot boxes (thanks @Elnnina ), to hold my larger projects.

Hopefully I'll feel something like, when I finish work, and can spend a few minutes basting the collar on.

Jessie