The Sewing Place

Tube quilting

Sara-S

Tube quilting
« on: November 08, 2021, 11:04:04 AM »
This is a way of cutting a bunch of half-square triangles from the same fabrics I got a link to this video from my quilt guild;
https://www.nationalquilterscircle.com/video/tube-quilting-jelly-rolls-015612/

I haven't tried it yet, but it looks interesting. Anyone here ever tried it? Opinions?
You can't scare me. I taught high school for 32 years.

BrendaP

Re: Tube quilting
« Reply #1 on: November 08, 2021, 12:18:26 PM »
@Sara-S   Those are not half square triangles, they are quarter square triangles.

Quarter square triangles have the long side cut on grain and the shorter sides on the bias whilst half square triangles have the long side on the bias and the short sides  on grain.

The squares formed from the pairs of triangles formed in that video all have bias outside edges which is not recomended.  If you want to use the tube method to make half square triangles you should start with strips cut on the bias, not straight grain which is what jelly rolls are
Brenda.  My machines are: Corona, a 1953 Singer 201K-3, Caroline, a 1940 Singer 201K-3, Thirza, 1949 Singer 221K, Azilia, 1957 Singer 201K-MK2 and Vera, a Husqvarna 350 SewEasy about 20 years old. Also Bernina 1150 overlocker and Elna 444 Coverstitcher.
http://paternoster.orpheusweb.co.

Lilian

Re: Tube quilting
« Reply #2 on: November 08, 2021, 14:04:50 PM »
@Sara-S   Those are not half square triangles, they are quarter square triangles.

Quarter square triangles have the long side cut on grain and the shorter sides on the bias whilst half square triangles have the long side on the bias and the short sides  on grain.

The squares formed from the pairs of triangles formed in that video all have bias outside edges which is not recomended.  If you want to use the tube method to make half square triangles you should start with strips cut on the bias, not straight grain which is what jelly rolls are

Thank you @BrendaP I am always trying to remember the difference with HST and QST  :)
Willing but not always able :)

Sara-S

Re: Tube quilting
« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2021, 14:21:38 PM »
I stand corrected. But why does it matter?
You can't scare me. I taught high school for 32 years.

Iminei

Re: Tube quilting
« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2021, 15:58:57 PM »
I didnt see a QST ... but I skipped through .. I saw a HST made with 3 fabrics, one half was one fabric the other half was pieced from two ... very odd.

@Sara-S

Half Square Triangle   [ You are not allowed to view attachments ]  

Quarter square Triangle   [ You are not allowed to view attachments ]  
The Imperfect Perfectionist sews again

Renegade Sewist

Re: Tube quilting
« Reply #5 on: November 08, 2021, 19:06:10 PM »
I stand corrected. But why does it matter?
Bias. @Sara-S  they did call them half square triangles.  ;) I haven't analyzed them yet to see what they are. That happens today. It's always better to sew seams with the straight of grain as it's more stable. Sewing on bias it's easy to stretch and distort. That's why a lot of simple patterns suggested for beginners don't have any bias seams.

Iminei

Re: Tube quilting
« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2021, 19:29:23 PM »
There are tutorials for both in The Darkside

Click on the first pic to bring it up to full size, then on the I icon*  or 3 bars/buttons to bring up the destructions to the side of the pic

*I use a laptop
The Imperfect Perfectionist sews again

BrendaP

Re: Tube quilting
« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2021, 23:20:33 PM »
If you cut a square of fabric (on grain) and then cut it into two diagonally you get two half square triangles; the long side is on the bias and the short sides are with the grain.  This is the type of triangle used most in patchwork, when you join two of them together to make another square the sides of that square are on grain and stable.

If you cut a square of fabric (on grain) and then cut diagonally in both directions to make four triangles they are quarter square triangles.  The long side is on grain and the shorter sides are on the bias.  Join two of those together to make a square and the outside edges of that square are on the bias and liable to stretch and fray. 

The main use of quarter square triangles is for setting triangles with on-point designs.  You join the bias short edges to the sides of the blocks, which hopefully are on grain and stable, and the longer on grain edge of the triangle is parallel to the edge or border of the quilt.

The tube method of making pairs of triangles already joined together, as shown in that video made pairs of quarter square triangles with bias short sides and on grain long sides which were already sewn together.  To achieve true half square triangles ready joined to another triangle you have to start with bias cut strips - which excludes the use of jelly rolls.
Brenda.  My machines are: Corona, a 1953 Singer 201K-3, Caroline, a 1940 Singer 201K-3, Thirza, 1949 Singer 221K, Azilia, 1957 Singer 201K-MK2 and Vera, a Husqvarna 350 SewEasy about 20 years old. Also Bernina 1150 overlocker and Elna 444 Coverstitcher.
http://paternoster.orpheusweb.co.

BrendaP

Re: Tube quilting
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2021, 23:59:32 PM »
Here are a few triangles cut to show the difference.  Apologies for not ironing the fabrics!
Both are woven stripes with the stripes running down the length of the fabric.

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Half square triangles.

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Quarter square triangles

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Two half square triangles joined together to make squares.
To get the stripes at right angles I flipped one of teh squares over, but with printed fabric you need to cut on the other diagonal.

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However you arrange quarter square triangles when you sew two together you get bias edges on the outside of the square.
Brenda.  My machines are: Corona, a 1953 Singer 201K-3, Caroline, a 1940 Singer 201K-3, Thirza, 1949 Singer 221K, Azilia, 1957 Singer 201K-MK2 and Vera, a Husqvarna 350 SewEasy about 20 years old. Also Bernina 1150 overlocker and Elna 444 Coverstitcher.
http://paternoster.orpheusweb.co.

BrendaP

Re: Tube quilting
« Reply #9 on: November 09, 2021, 00:09:49 AM »
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Four quarter square triangles can be joined to make a four patch square with the stable on grain long edges on the outsides of that square.

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Cut conventially a square of fabric yields two QSTs with the grain running lengthways (weft direction) and two QSTs with the grain running across the width (warp direction).  Using striped fabrics can produce some interesting results but can be wasteful.  If using striped fabrics  for setting triangles you need to cut twice as many as needed and keep the half in the 'wrong' direction for another project.

« Last Edit: November 09, 2021, 00:12:11 AM by BrendaP »
Brenda.  My machines are: Corona, a 1953 Singer 201K-3, Caroline, a 1940 Singer 201K-3, Thirza, 1949 Singer 221K, Azilia, 1957 Singer 201K-MK2 and Vera, a Husqvarna 350 SewEasy about 20 years old. Also Bernina 1150 overlocker and Elna 444 Coverstitcher.
http://paternoster.orpheusweb.co.

Renegade Sewist

Re: Tube quilting
« Reply #10 on: November 09, 2021, 02:35:20 AM »
Nice visual aids @BrendaP:perfect10:

Iminei

Re: Tube quilting
« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2021, 06:07:13 AM »
BrendaP is, after all, The Goddess of The Darkside!!!
The Imperfect Perfectionist sews again

BrendaP

Re: Tube quilting
« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2021, 10:11:51 AM »
I hope that has explained the difference between HSTs and QSTs - and why I say that the tube method video produces QSTs and not HSTs.
Brenda.  My machines are: Corona, a 1953 Singer 201K-3, Caroline, a 1940 Singer 201K-3, Thirza, 1949 Singer 221K, Azilia, 1957 Singer 201K-MK2 and Vera, a Husqvarna 350 SewEasy about 20 years old. Also Bernina 1150 overlocker and Elna 444 Coverstitcher.
http://paternoster.orpheusweb.co.