The Sewing Place

Poll

Vote for the winner of the Fun with Stripes contest - everyone has two votes

#1 BrendaP’s 1st entry
0 (0%)
#2 Acorn’s entry
8 (6.8%)
#3 Lachica’s entry
2 (1.7%)
#4 Doesntworkonwood’s entry
37 (31.6%)
#5 SewRuthieSews’ entry
2 (1.7%)
#6 BrendaP’s 2nd entry
0 (0%)
#7 Wildatlanticway’s entry
4 (3.4%)
#8 Indigotiger’s entry
31 (26.5%)
#9 Renita’s entry
10 (8.5%)
#10 StitchinTime’s entry
23 (19.7%)

Total Members Voted: 59

Voting closed: July 15, 2019, 01:08:33 AM

Fun with Stripes contest - voting thread

Manuela

Fun with Stripes contest - voting thread
« on: June 24, 2019, 07:39:43 AM »

#1 BrendaP's 1st Entry


It's a nightie so loose fitting and oversize.  Long enough to reach to my ankles 0_0
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What did you make and how did you play with the stripes.
The front and back bodice sectons are cut on the cross, partly for the effect but also much more ecconomical with the fabric; off centre lengthways fold for the skirt pieces and then bodice pieces from the remainder.
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Pattern used

Butterick 5544

A short description on how you made it/problems overcome/etc.
I omitted all the frills; they would have needed masses of fabric and made unecessary bulk - it's a nightie!

Also I cut the front bodice single and used buttons all the way up (pattern says double so that the lapels can be folded back) the pattern on the underlayer would have showed through.

All the seams are overlocked, elastic at wrists zig-zagged rather than casing, and the hems are top stitched with  :vintage:  The buttonholes did its job too.




#2 Acorns Entry

I've just realised that I have made stripes this month!!

What did you make and how did you play with the stripes?
I made a dress and nappy cover pants for my 6 month old goddaughter.  I didn't really play with the stripes, but I did make sure that they were balanced and symmetrical on the dress and the sleeves (and the pants), and that the centre stripe on the bodice matched up with the centre stripe on the skirt - and the pants!!  Unfortunately I don't have a picture of the back, but it has white heart-shaped buttons, and the stripes match up there too.

Pattern used:  Puperita Blue Tit dress and their nappy cover pants.

A short description on how you made it/problems overcome/etc.
The fabric is a Laura Ashley cotton lawn that has been in my stash for about 23 years.  I know this because I used the first part of it to make a dress for my oldest goddaughter when she was 6 months old - and she has just had her 23rd birthday!  The dress bodice and the pants are lined with white cotton lawn, and the word 'Blessed' is embroidered on the inside of the bodice.

I made both pretty much according to the patterns, although I used French seams so that there are no raw edges visible anywhere.  I added elastic to the sleeves, but kept it loose, because I want to be the godmother who made the pretty dresses, not the one who tortured her with tight elastic!

I hadn't used the nappy cover pattern before, but it is excellent, and was great fun to make.  The pants are fully lined and used what I think is called the burrito method.  I was very good and actually followed the instructions even though at one stage I wasn't sure what I was doing - but it worked like a dream.

They fit her beautifully, although I'm afraid I don't have a good photo to show you.

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#3 Lachica’s Entry

what did I make?Skirt for 2 year old GD.
how did I play with stripes?I didn't, but I knew that the stripes would appear horizontal at back & front & diagonal as the fabric draped.
pattern?I folded my fabric into 4 then measured from the centre point, marking at 10cm and again at 41cm. (Radius of waist line and radius to hem).  Cut along both curves to give a circle with a hole in the middle.
how did I make it? bought 40mm wide elastic, stitched it into a circle 50cm circumference. Overlocked circular hole in centre of fabric, stitched to elastic using 3step zigzag. Ran a gathering stitch around the hem about 5mm from edge, pulled up enough to avoid creases. Pressed then 2 needle coverlock.   [ You are not allowed to view attachments ]  
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#4 Doesntworkonwood’s Entry

Front
Side
Back

What did you make and how did you play with the stripes I made a maxi shirt dress. The design of the pattern meant that the yoke's stripes went in the opposite direction of the rest of the dress. I also tried to pattern match the centre front and back, as well as the side seams on the skirt.
 
Pattern used Simplicity 8014. I made view B with the skirt of view A.

A short description on how you made it/problems overcome/etc. Because I'd only ordered two meters of fabric (and Fabworks kindly sent me about 20cm extra) I decided to omit the full collar and pockets so that I could fit it in. I also ommitted the center back seam of the skirt so that I could pattern match with the bodice by cutting it on the same fold. The matching on the side seams of the skirt was sort of accidental. I didn't cut intending to match, but when I realised that there was only about 5mm in it I fudged it a little and hand basted the seams to get them to match.




#5 SewRuthieSews's Entry


I made a cool summer top from a striped cheesecloth with some seersucker type qualities.


I started with the free pattern, sent to subscribers of the Prima women's magazine.

My version most closely resembles View B, however I curved the front hem, and cut the back curve slightly longer. I raised the back neckline slightly and scooped the front neckline slightly. I extended the cut on sleeves and added a wide bias band. I cut the back on the fold. Instead of the facing provided I finished the neckline with a bias band.

The bias bands were different widths and applied in different ways to suit the application. The one at the neck was 2 inches wide folded in half and sewn on to the wrong side of the neckline, folded round to the right side, pressed and topstitched. This gives a very neat and stable neckline.
The bias bands on the sleeve are 3" wide, folded in half and sewn to the right side with the seam then pressed towards the body and the side seam sewn,






#6 BrendaP's 2nd Entry

What did you make and how did you play with the stripes
Inspired by the recent thread about lifestyle changes I made some waxed food wraps, three medium and one large and a small bag.  The fabric is red and grey stripes; left over from a dress and matches the kitchen.

Minimal sewing skills, but I did make sure I cut on-grain in both directions and I overlocked the edges.

Pattern used
None

A short description on how you made it/problems overcome/etc.
I watched several You-tube tutorials, then ordered some beeswax and jojoba oil.
Grated the wax (akin to grating hard cheese) then placed freshly laundered fabric over baking parchment on a metal baking tin.  Scattered wax and a few drops of the oil over the fabric, topped with another layer of baking parchment and ironed.  I used my small travel iron and just kept going until the wax melted and oozed into all of the fabric.

I've used them for wrapping sandwiches a couple of times and the large one is currently wrpped around an iceberg lettuce in the fridge.

Pictures
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#7 WildAtlanticWay’s Entry

What did you make and how did you play with the stripes

A cross body bag as a present for my lovely daughter-in-law. The playing with stripes element is joining pieces together for the long strap and also mixing stripes with spots, diagonals and florals for a quirky feel.

Pattern used (commercial or self-drafted, anything goes)

Followed a YouTube tutorial.

A short description on how you made it/problems overcome/etc.

Had previously made the same bag in pinky colours with a button closure at the top but felt that DIL might prefer something more secure so added a zip to the lining. I’d previously made a Tote bag that had a zipped lining so adapted that. I used Aldi Fat Quarters and a zip from Aldi too.

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#8 Indigotiger’s Entry

What did you make and how did you play with the stripes
an Everyday Dress.  I had a lot of fun changing the directions of the striped fabric, bias on the bodice fronts, horizontal on the collar, inner button band, and back yoke, vertical on the bodice back, outer button band gores, and sleeves. The vertical stripes on the gores form chevrons where the seams meet. I played with various options for the place where the button band and collar met, to find the one I liked the best.

Pattern used
my "Everyday Dress" from my small collection of heavily adapted and transformed patterns. I think that the gored skirt of this one originally came from a Sandra Betzina pattern, the front bodice from a Tom and Linda Platt pattern, and the rest of the pattern is self drafted

A short description on how you made it/problems overcome/etc.

I had been saving this striped black/grey/blue fabric for some years, and in the interim, I somewhat expanded in size, which meant that I didn't have quite enough fabric... I laid out the pattern pieces and determined that if I made the skirt panels a little shorter, changed my usual peter pan collar to a straight band convertible collar, cut the button bands from the scraps in two different directions, and pieced the pockets so that only the area visible was from the striped fabric, I could still get a wearable dress.

I knew that adding a decorative band of fabric to the bottom edge of the skirt would be simple, as I have done that before, to good effect. I used the fabric from a much beloved and worn out black/grey polkadot Everyday Dress for both the hemline trim, and most of the pocket pieces...

There was barely enough of the stripey fabric left to cut out pieces large enough to overlap the size of the pocket openings, so I chose to simply zig zag the fabric in place on both raw edges, holding the edges down neatly onto the polkadot fabric. Any other seam treatment would have created either stiffness or a ridge right at my hipline. Using the "fashion fabric" for only part of the pocketing is a technique I have only seen in things like jeans, and have never tried before.

The collar was probably the most fun part of the project (despite my having to draft out a plain band collar). Before sewing it all together, I tried both ways of arranging the button band fabric, horizontal or vertical stripes on the outside. My initial thought of horizontal on the outside didn't work as well, since the horizontal stripes looked odd with the bias stripes. I am quite pleased with the way the small lapels turned out, and my having to piece the bias binding for the neckline meant that I could have the direction of the bias on the lapels be mirrored.

My new stripey dress has proven to be a good addition to my wardrobe, and will be useful in all but deep summer, either by itself or in winter as a middle layer with knitwear under it and a pinafore over it





#9 Renita's entry

What did you make and how did you play with stripes:
I made a tunic/tabard from handwoven fabric.  The woven fabric was pieced together then sewn in such a way that the stripes in the fabric change direction.  On the 'front' the stripes run vertically on the 'left' and horizontally on the 'right', with a v-neck.  On the 'back', the stripes are on the diagonal and there is a piece that forms a shawl, for want of a better word.  All these directions are relative, as the garment can be worn front to back and/or inside out and/or with the collar tucked in or left out. 

I haven't tried wearing it upside down...

I had fun both in the making of the stripes, while weaving the fabric itself, then in the positioning of them in the final garment.

Pattern:
The design is based on one in a Saori patternbook.  It's a bit of fabric origami, known as a 'squid' because of its final shape.  It's always different, depending on the nature and width of the fabric used, but generally hangs well and is very comfortable to wear.


A short description of how you made it, problems etc:
The fabric is a mix of cotton, wool and potentially other fibres, woven on a plain black warp.  I played with colour and weaving techniques to produce stripes of different colours, widths and texture.  After wet finishing, the fabric was cut into 4 equal lengths then pieced to make a square of approx. 1m.  The garment then basically involves sewing two adjacent sides together, leaving enough space to get your head through, adding some armholes and finishing the hem.
 I transferred some of the hem cut-off from the back around to the front, so I'd have a reasonably level hem and to maximise my fabric usage.  Seams are either lapped (woven selvedges = no chance of fraying), or flat felled to enclose raw/cut edges.  The arm-holes were pre-stitched, then cut out and self-bound using fabric scraps.

I decided against pockets to keep it as flexible as possible - the garment has no right or wrong side really.  I elected to turn the hem up towards the side with the fringe showing, as that seemed the more casual option.

I've worn it today, along with pieces from last year's SWAKOP, and think it's a good contender for a spot in this year's collection.

Here's some of the wearing options at the top (and my sewing supervisor and general boss, far right...), and the garment laid out on the floor, along with the left-over fabric (very efficient garment design!) at the bottom.  The colour is much more accurate in the top images.








#10 StitchInTime’s Entry

What did you make and how did you play with the stripes
I made a patchwork, quilted tote bag using vertical and horizontal stripes of different widths. The stripes were used to hide an external zipped pocket and to make a feature of an internal zipped pocket. The stripes were continued on to the handles and offcuts from the handles were used to make an internal slip pocket.



Pattern used (commercial or self-drafted, anything goes)
The inspiration for this bag was a woven striped bag produced for a London department store. I used a supermarket tote bag to give me an idea of what size to make and took the opportunity to shorten the handles as shop bought bags seem designed for someone several inches taller than me.

A short description on how you made it/problems overcome/etc.
The first problem I had was that most of my fabrics were black and white, but one was black and cream, so I tea-dyed all the fabrics to get a uniform colour.



I used patchwork (including partial seams) to get the different widths and different directions of stripes. Once the patchwork pieces were the correct size, they were lightly quilted using stitch-in-the-ditch onto offcuts of wadding fused on to a backing of woven interfacing. The handles were also pieced and then reinforced with a woven fusible interfacing before being wrapped around a soft handle cording. I added three pockets to the bag - a “hidden” zip pocket on the outside, a zip pocket on the inside with striped piping, and a slip pocket on the inside using remnants from making the handles.




I forgot to mention the main problem I had making this bag - my sewing was significantly impeded by the determination of Not-our-Cat to sit on the fabric at any opportunity.












« Last Edit: July 08, 2019, 01:11:18 AM by Manuela »

Manuela

Re: Fun with Stripes contest - voting thread
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2019, 01:11:47 AM »
Voting has started  :D

Bodgeitandscarper

Re: Fun with Stripes contest - voting thread
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2019, 09:44:10 AM »
Can I vote for all of them?  No?  Very difficult to just choose two!

Greybird

Re: Fun with Stripes contest - voting thread
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2019, 09:57:35 AM »
Another impossible choice!

BrendaP

Re: Fun with Stripes contest - voting thread
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2019, 10:12:31 AM »
Difficult, difficult choices again, but I have voted.
Brenda.  My machines are: Corona, a 1953 Singer 201K-3, Caroline, a 1940 Singer 201K-3, Thirza, 1949 Singer 221K, Azilia, 1957 Singer 201K-MK2 and Vera, a Husqvarna 350 SewEasy about 20 years old. Also Bernina 1150 overlocker and Elna 444 Coverstitcher.
http://paternoster.orpheusweb.co.

b15erk

Re: Fun with Stripes contest - voting thread
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2019, 10:25:50 AM »
Very difficult choice to make.  Excellent efforts from everyone.

Jessie
Jessie, who is very happy to be here!!  :),  but who has far too many sewing machines to be healthy, and a fabric stash which is becoming embarrassing.

hernibs

Re: Fun with Stripes contest - voting thread
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2019, 10:57:17 AM »
Wonderful selection of stripey goodness.....how on earth will I choose only two....very hard.

I am always amazed at the cleverness of the members.

Surest1tch

Re: Fun with Stripes contest - voting thread
« Reply #7 on: July 09, 2019, 14:40:14 PM »
Done, I've had to come back 4 times to make a decision! The standards are so high.

Holly Berry

Re: Fun with Stripes contest - voting thread
« Reply #8 on: July 09, 2019, 15:34:36 PM »
Wow this was so difficult. We have some very talented people on here.
Procrastination get behind me

Manuela

Re: Fun with Stripes contest - voting thread
« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2019, 04:07:16 AM »
51 members have voted, 2 more days of voting  :)

Kenora

Re: Fun with Stripes contest - voting thread
« Reply #10 on: July 13, 2019, 13:36:36 PM »
Just seen this, but - boy - is it difficult. So many great ideas for stripes. But I've voted.
Minding my P's & Q's in Portreath

Catllar

Re: Fun with Stripes contest - voting thread
« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2019, 17:11:17 PM »
Have I already voted?

Can't  seem to do it , and I guess that must be the only reason!
If life gives you lemons, add to gin and tonic !