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Messages - suburban

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Fun with Fabric / Re: Does a dog Bandana have to be 100% cotton?
« on: March 29, 2021, 16:20:08 PM »
I like a bandana on a dog @Deafoldbat my dog doesn't drool but after she's been to the groomers a large scar is visible down the back of her neck where a lump was removed. I put a bandana on until the hair grows a bit  :woof:

I never thought of that.   :thinking:  I mean that a potential customer would have that need.  Please don't think of me as Ms Greed is Good.  I mean, I'm sorry your dog had to have a surgical procedure.  But there are reasons why someone would like to buy dog "fashion accessories", other than for frivolous purposes...

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Fun with Fabric / Re: Does a dog Bandana have to be 100% cotton?
« on: March 29, 2021, 16:14:41 PM »
Why, unless it really drools, does a dog need a bandana? It's a dog, not a fashion accessory. (Joins poultry behind settee - some of you will get that ;))

You're right - perhaps no dog needs one.  I will be "marketing" what I make as a fashion accessory.  I use quotation marks because I feel a bit of a fraud, having not even established a company / small business yet!  But you know what I mean..

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Fun with Fabric / Re: Does a dog Bandana have to be 100% cotton?
« on: March 29, 2021, 16:12:19 PM »
Our woofbags have fleece suits, and some thinner stretch polyester type ones, so I'd say, no, it doesn't need to be cotton.  Fleece is great, easily sewn, easily machine embroidered as well if you do that.

That's a good point!  I see those fleece body suits everywhere now. They always look great.  I suppose with spring / summer arriving I won't see them as much.  However, I never thought of that!

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Fun with Fabric / Re: Does a dog Bandana have to be 100% cotton?
« on: March 29, 2021, 16:10:54 PM »
If it's a gentle curve and mostly on the bias you will liely get away without clipping if you use a narrow seam allowance (1/4 inch - 6mm).  The more stable and closely woven the fabric the more necessary it is to clip.  Craft weight cotton is fairly forgiving and will allow you to do that.  If you use poly-cotton it bocomes a bit less flexible as the poly content increases.

Thank you!  I will now google 'craft weight cotton'!  I only used poly-cotton when I first started sewing, because it was cheaper.  I thought it was like the poor relation?  Or that dog owners would think I was short-changing them by not using 100% cotton. This is all in the future though, I'm just the Queen of Procrastinators...


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Fun with Fabric / Re: Does a dog Bandana have to be 100% cotton?
« on: March 29, 2021, 16:06:58 PM »
Hi @suburban I have made a few bandanas for my dog, only small cause she is small.  I make them from 100% cotton with a slight curve but I make them double-sided with a small seam allowance, turning it through and topstitch around it.

EDIT: spelling

Thanks Lilian!  I do the same thing, turning it through. 

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Fun with Fabric / Does a dog Bandana have to be 100% cotton?
« on: March 28, 2021, 16:28:59 PM »
Hi

I've been sewing dog bandanas and decided the curved 'bib' type are the best fitting. I do my best in terms of following the rules.  I know about making little cuts into the curve ( in my case, it's a gradual concave curve), but I wonder if I can avoid doing that - because the seam allowance will be 6 mm and I don't want to finish the seams.

It's not that I'm lazy, it's just that (for research purposes) I deconstructed the same 'bib  / boomerang' type bandanas by a big seller on 'Etsy'.  I noticed that she didn't appear to have finished her seams.  She had zero puckering around the concave curve of her bandana.  I wonder how she achieved that?   How did she end up with no puckering without making snips?  You see, the seam, when opened-up presented no evidence of having been clipped.

If you google suitable fabric for making dog bandanas, you get "100% cotton."  Would any of you use fabric other than cotton to make a dog bandana?  I don't fancy using anything which would irritate or cause harm to a dog, nor do I want to sew with something with a lot of stretch, because I'd struggle sewing with it.

Any suggestions?

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The Haberdashery / Re: Vecro for Fastening Dog Bandanas
« on: February 02, 2021, 18:12:11 PM »
@suburban I haven't used Velcro on dog outfits but I have used it on difficult fabrics. I used the stick on stuff to place it exactly where I wanted it and then stitched it in place if that's any help. I've just had a look at my dogs shop bought coat and the Velcro is 2" wide on that.
  Thank you for looking!  :angel:

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The Haberdashery / Re: Vecro for Fastening Dog Bandanas
« on: January 27, 2021, 09:47:27 AM »
I hate Velcro, it’s the invention of the devil.

It would not behave with me.  I didn't like the way you cut it with scizzors, down to the right size.  You just get an ugly, unfinished look at the cut mark.  I know there are little velcro round circles on the market, but I don't fancy my chances on sourcing them.  It was hard enough to get the regular soft-sew on "tape" version.  It would actually be perfect for my needs, but at the same time unworkable.    :meditation:

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The Haberdashery / Re: Vecro for Fastening Dog Bandanas
« on: January 25, 2021, 01:53:06 AM »
I suppose that's true. :o

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The Haberdashery / Re: Vecro for Fastening Dog Bandanas
« on: January 22, 2021, 16:52:58 PM »
Hello and thanks for replying.  I've forgotten how to reply to single posts, so I might right this twice. 

1  Thanks 'Bodgeitandscarper' - Different makes do seem to have their quirks.  I wish there was just one brand of sewing machine so we'd all know where we are.   

2  Thanks 'sewmuchmore'  I looked on Amazon uk and bought some.  It's arriving from the States!  Won't be here until mid-February.  Jeez.  Near enough sold out too.  Ebay and other distributors were the same.   Everybody's "crafting" because of Lockdown...

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The Haberdashery / Vecro for Fastening Dog Bandanas
« on: January 12, 2021, 16:01:35 PM »
Hello again,

I tried using velcro before - this was back when I tried to make a dog coat.  Running before I could walk.  So I'm trying dog bandanas now.  One thing I remembered about velcro, is that it was a pain to work with, but I'd like to have another go before I give up.  Sew-in and glue type velcro didn't want to behave with me.  I don't know whether I used a velcro which was too strong - because after a couple of days they just ripped each other off the dog coat.  Can anyone recommend a type of velcro suitable for fastening a dog bandana?  Any tips re machine sewing velcro onto a cotton fabric?  Needle size, stitch length etc.  I'd rather avoid adhesive, if possible.  Any help appreciated, thanks.

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Fun with Fabric / Re: Any tips on "We Print Your Design on Fabric"?
« on: January 10, 2021, 13:38:18 PM »
It really depends on what you're trying to make, what volume of product you want, how you plan on marketing it.

Don't feel bad about not knowing how pricey the fabric is. The printing places are premium priced on the blank fabric.

I had a friend start a premium potting soil business for soils that sold by the small box at upscale plant nurseries. He partnered with his college best friend who had a business marketing degree. I was hanging out with them one day, pasting labels on boxes when we started talking about cost, profit, all the good stuff. Marketing guy said something alarming. He had totally messed up the books and they were selling the product at a significant loss.

That ended the business and friendship.


The more I investigate this malarky, the more I realise the importance of marketing.  I've seen someone with mediocre product outselling real talent on 'Etsy' etc.  I mean wildly outselling them. I don't begrudge the budding tycoon their success - there's nothing wrong with their product, but I've looked at how they've done it and thought,  "Ahhh...Marketing.  Someone went to Business School."  Then again, what did I expect?


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Fun with Fabric / Re: Any tips on "We Print Your Design on Fabric"?
« on: November 30, 2020, 16:49:20 PM »
Very strange, I replied to you yesterday but it done gone! I've used Spoonflower a couple of times and while they are OK for a special project it's a bit pricey if you need a lot. I needed a technical quick dry fabric for travel and it has fulfilled the brief - lasting well and the printing is still good - been using it for about 6 years  already.
 

Yeah, I looked at that site - it's great - some lovely stuff.  Saw some patterns already suitable for my projects.  It's not really that I wanted to be the designer;  I just wanted specific details.  I did find suitable stuff on 'Spoonflower', but they're pricey. It's not just a one-off thing I'd want you see.  Thank you for replying (twice!)

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Fun with Fabric / Re: Any tips on "We Print Your Design on Fabric"?
« on: November 30, 2020, 16:41:38 PM »
Depends on what fabric you want and how washable you want the item to be. Manuela has had it done. Mostly successful but I recall one particular fabric was dreadful.

I'd spend the price for samples or fat quarters to check the suitability of whatever fabric to my end use.
  Yes, I've thought about that.  I think I forgot to mention I wanted to start a business, but money-no-have.  I just underestimated the cost of basic fabric before anything's printed on it.

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Fun with Fabric / Re: Any tips on "We Print Your Design on Fabric"?
« on: November 30, 2020, 16:36:43 PM »
Lots of print your own on FB....

I didn't think of that!  Sadly I don't use 'Facebook'.  It's just a personal issue I have with it.  Thanks for responding though, it reminded me to look in less obvious places.

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